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Behavior Analysis in Practice

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 209–215 | Cite as

Targeting Staff Treatment Integrity of the PEAK Relational Training System Using Behavioral Skills Training

  • Adam D. HahsEmail author
  • James Jarynowski
Brief Practice
  • 192 Downloads

Abstract

PEAK is a language curriculum dedicated to expanding language via the science of behavior analysis. The present study sought to evaluate the extent to which a behavioral skills training (BST) program impacted treatment integrity for six direct care staff implementing the Promoting the Emergence of Advanced Knowledge Relational Training System (PEAK) with six individuals with autism. We used a 2-h workshop-like Behavioral Skills Training (BST; instruction, modeling, rehearsal, and feedback) targeting PEAK treatment integrity. The results indicate that BST improved overall procedural integrity for all staff. All learners with autism improved their total percentage of correct, independent responding specific to the targeted programs. Further, all (6/6) staff maintained integrity to PEAK at well above baseline levels and all individuals with autism maintained high levels of performance specific to the targeted programs. The importance of appropriate training and treatment integrity given the implementation of PEAK is discussed.

Keywords

BST PEAK Treatment integrity Relational frame theory 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

No conflict of interest exists for either of the authors involved with this study.

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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