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Behavior Analysis in Practice

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 402–406 | Cite as

Training Parents in Saudi Arabia to Implement Discrete Trial Teaching with their Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Ahmad M. EidEmail author
  • Sarah M. Aljaser
  • Anoud N. AlSaud
  • Sultana M. Asfahani
  • Ohoud A. Alhaqbani
  • Rafat S. Mohtasib
  • Hesham M. Aldhalaan
  • Mitch Fryling
Brief Practice

Abstract

The present study evaluates the effects of a behavioral skill training package on parent implementation of discrete trial teaching with their children with autism spectrum disorder. Three mothers of children with autism participated in the study. The training package improved implementation for all three of the mothers. Moreover, these improvements generalized to skills that were not taught during training, maintained during follow-up probes, and resulted in improvements in child behavior.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Generalization Maintenance Parent training Social validity 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

References

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ahmad M. Eid
    • 1
    Email author
  • Sarah M. Aljaser
    • 1
  • Anoud N. AlSaud
    • 1
  • Sultana M. Asfahani
    • 1
  • Ohoud A. Alhaqbani
    • 1
  • Rafat S. Mohtasib
    • 1
  • Hesham M. Aldhalaan
    • 1
  • Mitch Fryling
    • 2
    return OK on get
  1. 1.Center for Autism Research, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research CenterRiyadhSaudi Arabia
  2. 2.California State UniversityLos AngelesUSA

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