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Behavior Analysis in Practice

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 47–50 | Cite as

Improving the Quality of Parent-Teacher Interactions in an Early Childhood Classroom

  • Hannah Berc
  • Jessica L. Doucette
  • Florence D. DiGennaro ReedEmail author
  • Pamela L. Neidert
  • Amy J. Henley
Empirical Report

Quality parent-teacher interactions promote positive relationships and valuable sharing of information (e.g., Endsley and Minish 1991; Ingvarsson and Hanley 2006), outcomes that affect parent satisfaction (Winkelstein 1981) and may also contribute to child development. Supportive relationships between families and educators facilitate child learning and decrease problem behavior (e.g., Fiese etal. 2006). Identifying ways to build positive relationships by promoting quality parent-teacher interactions in early childhood settings is a worthwhile endeavor. Unfortunately, these interactions occur infrequently during natural opportunities, such as morning drop-off in child care centers (Perlman and Fletcher 2012). To address this issue, we taught teachers to initiate quality interactions with parents by using a 12-step task analysis. We developed training procedures that would be easy to implement in a busy child care setting and would be acceptable to teachers who participated in the...

Keywords

Task Analysis Early Childhood Setting Early Childhood Classroom Morning Shift Child Development Center 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hannah Berc
    • 1
  • Jessica L. Doucette
    • 1
  • Florence D. DiGennaro Reed
    • 1
    Email author
  • Pamela L. Neidert
    • 1
  • Amy J. Henley
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Applied Behavioral ScienceUniversity of KansasLawrenceUSA

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