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The Analysis of Verbal Behavior

, Volume 34, Issue 1–2, pp 44–61 | Cite as

Deconstructing Common Bidirectional Naming: A Proposed Classification Framework

  • Emma HawkinsEmail author
  • Grant Gautreaux
  • Mecca Chiesa
Article

Abstract

Conceptually, the use of the technical term naming appears to be a broad term that describes several subtypes of emergent verbal behavior. Miguel (The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 32, 125–138, Miguel, 2016) introduces the concept of subtypes of naming, specifically common bidirectional naming and intraverbal bidirectional naming. He defines common bidirectional naming as “the process of different stimuli evoking the same speaker and listener behaviour and becoming members of the same class” (p. 130). A review of the literature on common bidirectional naming yielded some ambiguities related to differences in how researchers in the field defined naming. This article suggests that common bidirectional naming may be further dissected to yield six subtypes of naming. We aligned previous research on emergent verbal behavior with a unified taxonomy as part of a larger proposed classification framework on naming. The impact of identifying the subtypes of common bidirectional naming on skill acquisition and curriculum design is discussed. Finally, recommendations are made for future research based on this framework.

Keywords

Naming Common bidirectional naming Emergent verbal behavior Incidental learning 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Emma Hawkins declares that she has no conflict of interest. Grant Gautreaux declares that he has no conflict of interest. Mecca Chiesa declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Jigsaw CABAS® SchoolCranleighUK
  2. 2.College of EducationNicholls State UniversityThibodauxUSA
  3. 3.Tizard CentreUniversity of KentCanterburyUK

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