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Evidence-Based Performance Management: Applying Behavioral Science to Support Practitioners

  • Matthew D. Novak
  • Florence D. DiGennaro ReedEmail author
  • Tyler G. Erath
  • Abigail L. Blackman
  • Sandra A. Ruby
  • Azure J. Pellegrino
Organizational Behavior Management in Health & Human Services
  • 26 Downloads

Abstract

The science of behavior has effectively addressed many areas of social importance, including the performance management of staff working in human-service settings. Evidence-based performance management entails initial preservice training and ongoing staff support. Initial training reflects a critical first training component and is necessary for staff to work independently within an organization. However, investment in staff must not end once preservice training is complete. Ongoing staff support should follow preservice training and involves continued coaching and feedback. The purpose of this article is to bridge the research-to-practice gap by outlining research-supported initial training and ongoing staff support procedures within human-serving settings, presenting practice guidelines, and sharing information about easy-to-implement ways practitioners may stay abreast of current research.

Keywords

Performance management Staff training Supervision 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Association for Behavior Analysis International 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.4001 Dole Human Development Center, Department of Applied Behavioral ScienceUniversity of KansasLawrenceUSA

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