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A Missed Opportunity: Universal School-Based Mental Health Literacy Programs

  • Matthew C. FadusEmail author
  • Joseph D. Harrison
Feature: Perspective

The needs of our communities to identify, treat, and facilitate long-term care of mental health conditions have grown exponentially. In order to ensure the well-being of patients and families, a multifaceted population-health approach is warranted to create a culture of mental health literacy, and a potentially valuable target of these interventions is embedded within our school systems. This article will seek to highlight the utility of universal school-based mental health programs by first providing a personal vignette from the authors that serves as an archetype of the present limitations in community mental health literacy and the consequences of stigma on help-seeking behaviors. The authors will then summarize evidence related to universal school-based mental health programs that encourages collaboration between academic psychiatrists, community health partners, and school administrators and educators.

The Impact of Stigma on Help-Seeking: Personal Vignette

I (M. F.) wish I had...

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Disclosures

On behalf of all authors, the corresponding author states that there is no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Academic Psychiatry 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Medical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA
  2. 2.University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA

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