Academic Psychiatry

, Volume 41, Issue 5, pp 656–660 | Cite as

Use of Electronic Resources for Psychiatry Clerkship Learning: A Medical Student Survey

  • Caitlin E. Snow
  • John Torous
  • Janna S. Gordon-Elliott
  • Julie B. Penzner
  • Fermonta Meyer
  • Robert Boland
In Brief Report

Abstract

Objective

The primary aim of this study is to examine medical students’ use patterns, preferences, and perceptions of electronic educational resources available for psychiatry clerkship learning.

Methods

Eligible participants included medical students who had completed the psychiatry clerkship during a 24-month period. An internet-based questionnaire was used to collect information regarding the outcomes described above.

Results

A total of 68 medical students responded to the survey. Most respondents reported high utilization of electronic resources on an array of devices for psychiatry clerkship learning and indicated a preference for electronic over print resources. The most commonly endorsed barriers to the use of electronic resources were that the source contained irrelevant and non-specific content, access was associated with a financial cost, and faculty guidance on recommended resources was insufficient. Respondents indicated a wish for more psychiatry-specific electronic learning resources.

Conclusion

The authors’ results suggest that a demand exists for high-quality electronic and portable learning tools that are relevant to medical student education in psychiatry. Psychiatry educators are usefully positioned to be involved in the development of such resources.

Keywords

Electronic resources Medical student Education Psychiatry 

References

  1. 1.
    Prasannan L, Gabbur N, Haughton M. Use of web resources among medical students at a large urban medical center. Obstet Gynecol. 2014;123 suppl 1:118S.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Zhang MW, Tsang T, Cheow E, et al. Enabling psychiatrists to be mobile phone app developers: insights into app development methodologies. JMIR MHealth UHealth. 2014;2(4), e53.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Torous J, Franzen J, O’Connor R, et al. Psychiatry residents’ use of educational websites: a pilot survey study. Acad Psychiatry. 2015;39(6):630–3.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Payne KB, Wharrad H, Watts K. Smartphone and medical related app use among medical students and junior doctors in the United Kingdom (UK): a regional survey. BMC Med Inform Decis Mak. 2012;12:121. doi:10.1186/1472-6947-12-121. http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6947/12/121.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    DeZee KJ, Durning S, Denton GD. Effect of electronic versus print format and different reading resources on knowledge acquisition in the third-year medicine clerkship. Teach Learn Med. 2005;17(4):349–54.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Olfson M, Blanco C, Wang S, et al. National trends in the mental health care of children, adolescents, and adults by office-based physicians. JAMA Psychiatry. 2014;71(1):81–90.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Egle JP, Smeenge DM, Kassem KM, et al. The internet school of medicine: use of electronic resources by medical trainees and the reliability of those resources. J Surg Educ. 2015;72(2):316–20.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Torous J, O’Connor R, Franzen J, et al. Creating a pilot educational psychiatry website: opportunities, barriers, and next steps. JMIR Med Educ. 2015;1(2):e14. doi:10.2196/mededu.4580.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Academic Psychiatry 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Caitlin E. Snow
    • 1
  • John Torous
    • 2
  • Janna S. Gordon-Elliott
    • 1
  • Julie B. Penzner
    • 1
  • Fermonta Meyer
    • 2
  • Robert Boland
    • 2
  1. 1.Weill Cornell MedicineNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

Personalised recommendations