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Academic Psychiatry

, Volume 40, Issue 4, pp 686–691 | Cite as

Building Research Capacity Across and Within Low- and Middle-Income Countries: The Collaborative Hubs for International Research on Mental Health

  • Daniel J. PilowskyEmail author
  • Graciela Rojas
  • LeShawndra N. Price
  • John Appiah-Poku
  • Bushra Razzaque
  • Mona Sharma
  • Marguerite Schneider
  • Soraya Seedat
  • Bárbara B. Bonini
  • Oye Gureje
  • Lola Kola
  • Crick Lund
  • Katherine Sorsdahl
  • Ricardo Araya
  • Paulo R. Menezes
Column: Educational Resource

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has a long history of engaging in global health research and research training activities. In 2010, Francis Collins, Director of the NIH, identified global health as a priority for the agency, noting the importance of increasing research on neglected illnesses and non-communicable diseases that contribute to high levels of morbidity and mortality in low-income countries [1]. Collins urged building research capacity and increasing training opportunities for investigators in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). That same year, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) released a funding opportunity announcement, the Collaborative Hubs for International Research on Mental Health (CHIRMH), to stimulate investigator-initiated research focusing on mental health interventions in World Bank-designated LMICs through integration of findings from translational, clinical, epidemiological, and policy research. A major focus of the initiative...

Notes

Acknowledgments

Research reported in this article was supported by the US National Institute of Mental Health of the National Institutes of Health under award numbers U19MH98718, U19MH95699, U19MH95718, U19MH98780, and U19MH95687. The views expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Health and Human Services, or the US Government.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Disclosures

On behalf of all the authors, the corresponding author states that there is no conflict of interest

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Copyright information

© Academic Psychiatry 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel J. Pilowsky
    • 1
    Email author
  • Graciela Rojas
    • 2
  • LeShawndra N. Price
    • 3
  • John Appiah-Poku
    • 4
  • Bushra Razzaque
    • 5
  • Mona Sharma
    • 6
  • Marguerite Schneider
    • 7
  • Soraya Seedat
    • 8
  • Bárbara B. Bonini
    • 9
  • Oye Gureje
    • 10
  • Lola Kola
    • 10
  • Crick Lund
    • 7
  • Katherine Sorsdahl
    • 7
  • Ricardo Araya
    • 11
  • Paulo R. Menezes
    • 9
  1. 1.Columbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Universidad de ChileSantiagoChile
  3. 3.National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  4. 4.Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and TechnologyKumasiGhana
  5. 5.Institute of PsychiatryRawalpindiPakistan
  6. 6.Public Health Foundation of IndiaNew DelhiIndia
  7. 7.University of Cape TownCape TownSouth Africa
  8. 8.Stellenbosch UniversityStellenboschSouth Africa
  9. 9.University of São PauloSão PauloBrazil
  10. 10.University of IbadanIbadanNigeria
  11. 11.London School of Hygiene and Tropical MedicineLondonUK

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