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Academic Psychiatry

, Volume 39, Issue 4, pp 410–415 | Cite as

Thrust Into the Breach: Psychiatry in a Combat Zone Within 1 Year of Residency Completion

  • Vincent F. CapaldiIIEmail author
  • Hanna D. Zembrzuska
Feature: Perspective

For even the seasoned military physician, the order to deploy into a combat zone is fraught with trepidation and anxiety. Despite expert training in cognitive behavioral techniques and anxiety mitigation measures, newly minted psychiatrists also experience changes in mood and associated affect when notified that they will be deploying shortly after graduating residency. This article was written by psychiatrists who deployed to Afghanistan within 1 year of completing residency. This article will discuss the value of military graduate medical education, the differences between psychiatric care in the training environment versus the deployed setting, and the resources that are available for psychiatrists in combat zones.

The article authors, Drs. Capaldi and Zembrzuska, graduated from the National Capital Region Internal Medicine and Psychiatry combined residency program in 2012. Dr. Capaldi deployed to Bagram, Afghanistan, in January 2013 and Dr. Zembrzuska deployed to Kandahar,...

Keywords

Behavioral Health Modafinil Service Member National Capital Region Behavioral Health Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Disclosure

The views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and do not reflect the official policy of the Department of the Army, Department of Defense, or the US Government. On behalf of all authors, the corresponding author states that there is no conflict of interest

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Copyright information

© Academic Psychiatry (outside the USA) 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR)Silver SpringUSA
  2. 2.Walter Reed National Military Medical CenterBethesdaUSA

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