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Aging Clinical and Experimental Research

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 795–796 | Cite as

Comment on: Acupressure in insomnia and other sleep disorders in elderly institutionalized patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease

  • Jose M. MoranEmail author
  • Juan D. Pedrera-Zamorano
Letter to the Editor

We have read with interest the paper from Simoncini et al. [1] about the use of acupressure in insomnia and other sleep disorders in institutionalized patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. We have found major objections in both the methodology and the data interpretation that make us believe that the conclusion reached by the authors is biased and do not demonstrate that acupressure has any effect in insomnia in those patients.

First, there is a major concern based on the patients’ distribution showed in Figs. 3 and 4. Based on the methodology presented in the manuscript, the same measurement [global health quality of life and Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI)] was carried at baseline (T0), after 2 months (at the end of the treatment) (T1) and 4 months after at the end of treatment (T2). If a patient in T1 and T2 could not perform test because of communication problems, the evaluation was limited to the neuropsychiatric inventory (NPI). The NPI was then administered to the...

Keywords

Sleep Disorder Peer Review Process Institutionalize Patient Neuropsychiatric Inventory Patient Distribution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

There is no conflict of interest.

Statement of human and animal rights

This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.

Informed consent

For this type of study a formal consent was not required.

Reference

  1. 1.
    Simoncini M, Gatti A, Quirico PE et al (2015) Acupressure in insomnia and other sleep disorders in elderly institutionalized patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. Aging Clin Exp Res 27:37–42CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Metabolic Bone Diseases Research Group, College of Nursing and Occupational TherapyUniversity of ExtremaduraCaceresSpain

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