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Aging Clinical and Experimental Research

, Volume 25, Issue 6, pp 633–636 | Cite as

Predictive effects of muscle strength after hospitalization in old patients

  • Gianluca Isaia
  • Francesca Greppi
  • Alessandra Pastorino
  • Erika Maria Bersano
  • Sokol Rrodhe
  • Nicoletta Aimonino Ricauda
  • Mario Bo
  • Katia Molinar Roet
  • Mauro Zanocchi
Original Article
  • 202 Downloads

Abstract

Background and aims

Frailty is a common situation that often influences clinical outcomes, disability or institutionalization. The present study aims to evaluate the weight of hand grip strength (HGS) reduction in terms of death or re-hospitalizations, at 3-month and 1-year follow-up.

Methods

Observational study performed on hospitalized patients aged 65 years or more. The HGS was measured twice: at hospital admission and discharge. The statistical analysis was performed using SPSS, version 18 for Windows. The χ 2 test was used to evaluate the relationship between HGS and different variables. Three-month and 1-year survival and hospital re-admissions have been analyzed using Kaplan–Meier’s curves. The analyses have been adjusted for age and gender.

Results

A total of 201 hospitalized patients have been recruited. Of them, 76 were males. The mean age was 81.79 ± 7.409 years. Of all the patients enrolled, 66.2 and 45.3 % did not show any impairment performing activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living, respectively. Moreover, patients were not cognitively impaired [SPMSQ (short portable mental status questionnaire ) m ± SD = 1.47 ± 0.794]. At 3-month follow-up patients with strength reduction had a relative risk of death more than seven times higher than the others (p = 0.047). Same results were observed at 1-year follow-up (95 % CI = 1.85–9.84; p = 0.000). There was no significant relationship between HGS and hospital re-admissions.

Conclusions

Effects of strength reduction occurring during a period of hospitalization could produce effects even after hospitalization itself. This increases the relevance of maintaining usual physical performance of patients even during hospitalization.

Keywords

Hand grip Frailty Strength Elderly 

Notes

Conflict of interest

The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gianluca Isaia
    • 1
  • Francesca Greppi
    • 1
  • Alessandra Pastorino
    • 1
  • Erika Maria Bersano
    • 2
  • Sokol Rrodhe
    • 1
  • Nicoletta Aimonino Ricauda
    • 2
  • Mario Bo
    • 2
  • Katia Molinar Roet
    • 2
  • Mauro Zanocchi
    • 2
  1. 1.Geriatric Division, Department of Clinical and Biological SciencesSan Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, University of TurinOrbassano (Turin)Italy
  2. 2.Geriatric Section, Department of Medical and Surgical DisciplinesS. Giovanni Battista Hospital, University of TorinoTurinItaly

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