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Current Oral Health Reports

, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp 33–38 | Cite as

Are Sex Steroid Hormones Influencing Periodontal Conditions? A Systematic Review

  • Aliye AkcalıEmail author
  • Zeynep Akcalı
  • Fareeha Batool
  • Catherine Petit
  • Olivier Huck
Systemic Diseases (N Buduneli, Section Editor)
  • 85 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Systemic Diseases

Abstract

Purpose of Review

The pulsatile fashion of the release of sex steroid hormones has an impact on periodontium. The aim of this systematic review was to determine whether sex steroid hormones influence periodontal diseases or not.

Recent Findings

MEDLINE via OVID, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database updated until July 2017 were searched and, particularly, the papers published over the past 5 years were reviewed.

Summary

The evidence is more supportive towards the effect of sex steroid hormone perturbations on an existing periodontal disease rather than the initiation of disease. Examination of potential diagnostics for preventive or therapeutic applications is needed in order to decrease the composite risks arising from the hormonal changes themselves. Also, further clinical trials comparing sex steroid hormone exposure on patients with similar baseline periodontal conditions are emerging in order to understand the causal mechanisms between the two, eventually, helping to make clearer clinical recommendations and guidelines for hormone-dominated periods in both men and women.

Keywords

Estrogens Periodontal diseases Periodontal indexes Progesterone Sex steroid hormones Testosterone 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance •• Of major importance

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aliye Akcalı
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Zeynep Akcalı
    • 3
  • Fareeha Batool
    • 4
  • Catherine Petit
    • 4
    • 5
  • Olivier Huck
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of Periodontology, School of DentistryUniversity of Witten/HerdeckeWittenGermany
  2. 2.Centre for Oral Clinical Research, Institute of Dentistry, Barts and The London School of Medicine and DentistryQueen Mary University of London (QMUL)LondonUK
  3. 3.Department of Internal MedicineHavran Government HospitalBalıkesirTurkey
  4. 4.Department of Periodontology, Faculté de Chirurgie DentaireUniversité de StrasbourgStrasbourgFrance
  5. 5.INSERM 1260 Regenerative NanomedicineFédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg (FMTS)StrasbourgFrance

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