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Current Oral Health Reports

, Volume 3, Issue 3, pp 179–186 | Cite as

Improving the Oral Health of American Indians and Alaska Natives

  • Kathy R. PhippsEmail author
Dental Public Health (R Collins, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Dental Public Health

Abstract

American Indian and Alaska Native people experience more oral disease and are more likely to have unmet oral health needs than the general US population. These disparities may be attributed to limited access to and use of the dental care delivery system plus a high prevalence of disease risk factors such as social inequities, diet and infant-feeding practices, smoking, and oral hygiene behaviors. This review provides information on the use of and effectiveness of strategies designed to increase access, prevent oral disease, and change systems. To address the oral health crisis in Indian Country, a multi-modal approach which engages the individual, family, community, tribal leadership, plus health and social service providers must be developed, implemented, and sustained. This multi-modal approach should combine primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention strategies layered with strategies to increase access and system changes to reduce the consequences of social inequities.

Keywords

American Indian Alaska native Native American Dental caries Periodontal disease 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Kathy Phipps declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Human and Animal Right and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by the author.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Oral Health Research ConsultantMorro BayUSA

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