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The Use of High-Tech Speech-Generating Devices as an Evidence-Based Practice for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Meta-analysis

  • Reem Muharib
  • Nouf M. AlzrayerEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate single-case studies that used high-tech speech-generating devices (SGDs) for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) ages 0–8. The focus of this review was to measure the effect size of high-tech SGD intervention on verbal behavior. The review included 20 studies with 54 participants with ASD. The results suggest that high-tech SGDs are strongly effective to teach manding, intraverbal, and multistep tacting to children with ASD. Another aim was to evaluate the quality of the studies based on Horner et al.’s (2005) quality indicators. The results suggest a moderate level of evidence for high-tech SGD intervention in children with ASD. Directions for future research and implications for practice are discussed.

Keywords

Speech-generating devices High-tech augmentative alternative communication Autism spectrum disorders Verbal behavior Communication skills 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Special Education and Child Development, Cato College of EducationThe University of North Carolina at CharlotteCharlotteUSA
  2. 2.Department of Special Education, College of EducationKing Saud UniversityRiyadhSaudi Arabia

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