Systematic Review of Methods for Teaching Social and Communicative Behavior with High-Tech Augmentative and Alternative Communication Modalities

  • Shawn P. Gilroy
  • Joseph P. McCleery
  • Geraldine Leader
Review Paper

Abstract

A systematic review was conducted to analyze the scope and breadth of the existing training protocols for establishing social and communicative behavior using high-tech, touchscreen devices. This review aimed to determine the degree to which studies evaluating high-tech communication aides have established procedures to extend, or completely replace, traditional low-tech communication training methods (e.g., Picture Exchange Communication System). Individual studies were evaluated based on the range of social and communicative skills targeted. The PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) methodology was utilized (Prospero: No. CRD42017055541) and systematic searches included the Scopus, PsycINFO, ScienceDirect, and SpringerLink databases. Studies were included in the review if their methods utilized high-tech devices as a vehicle for establishing social and/or communicative behavior. Single-case and group-design studies including children and adults were included in the review if participants were diagnosed with either autism spectrum disorder and/or other developmental disabilities. Fifty-six studies were included and the results of this review indicated that the existing support for high-tech communication aides has focused predominantly on a narrow band of social and communicative behavior (e.g., requesting) and that substantial research is warranted for establishing more advanced forms of social behavior, beyond requesting alone, using these new high-tech methods.

Keywords

Autism Technology Communication Socialization Evidence-based practice 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shawn P. Gilroy
    • 1
  • Joseph P. McCleery
    • 2
  • Geraldine Leader
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute for Lifecourse and SocietyNational University of Ireland, GalwayGalwayIreland
  2. 2.Center for Autism ResearchChildren’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyNational University of IrelandGalwayIreland

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