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A Meta-analysis of School-Based Social Interaction Interventions for Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Laci Watkins
  • Mark O’Reilly
  • Katherine Ledbetter-Cho
  • Russell Lang
  • Jeff Sigafoos
  • Michelle Kuhn
  • Nataly Lim
  • Cindy Gevarter
  • Nicolette Caldwell
Review Paper

Abstract

The purpose of this meta-analysis was to identify and evaluate the effectiveness of school-based social interaction interventions for adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). All 27 studies meeting predetermined inclusion criteria utilized single-case designs. Peer-mediated interventions, peer networks, behavioral skills training, and the teaching interaction procedure were the most frequently utilized strategies and produced large effects for lower, moderate, and higher functioning adolescents with ASD. Teachers rarely implemented interventions, though large effects were reported when they served as intervention agents. Future research concerning the acceptability and feasibility of using social interaction interventions in the classroom is needed in order to facilitate evidence-based practice. Additionally, research that targets more complex and nuanced social behaviors and assesses collateral effects such as academic performance and friendship quality appears warranted.

Keywords

Autism Adolescents Peer interaction Social skills Intervention Meta-analysis 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Special Education & Multiple AbilitiesThe University of AlabamaTuscaloosaUSA
  2. 2.The University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  3. 3.Texas State UniversitySan MarcosUSA
  4. 4.Victoria University of WellingtonWellingtonNew Zealand
  5. 5.The University of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA

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