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A Systematic Review of the Effectiveness of Precision Teaching for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

  • Devon Ramey
  • Sinéad Lydon
  • Olive Healy
  • Anna McCoy
  • Jennifer Holloway
  • Teresa Mulhern
Review Paper

Abstract

Precision teaching (PT) is an instructional method that aims to build fluent responding, characterized by accuracy and speed. Fluent behavior is associated with enhanced skill retention and maintenance, endurance, stability, and easy application to novel settings and stimuli. The current paper presents a systematic review of the extant literature examining the utility of PT methodologies for persons diagnosed with developmental disabilities. The empirical support for PT was evaluated in accordance with the National Autism Center’s (2009) National Standards Report guidelines. Fifty-five studies, categorized as targeting numeracy, literacy, vocational, and daily living skills, or other skills, were reviewed. Analysis of the strength of the research evidence for PT indicated that it is an emerging treatment for targeting skills in each of these skill categories. The implications of these findings for the research and clinical employment of PT methodologies among individuals with developmental disabilities are discussed.

Keywords

Precision teaching Fluency Developmental disability Intellectual disability Autism 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no competing of interests.

Ethical Approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

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*Indicates studies included in the review

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Devon Ramey
    • 1
  • Sinéad Lydon
    • 1
    • 2
  • Olive Healy
    • 1
  • Anna McCoy
    • 3
  • Jennifer Holloway
    • 3
  • Teresa Mulhern
    • 3
  1. 1.School of Psychology, Trinity College DublinUniversity of DublinDublin 2Ireland
  2. 2.Discipline of General PracticeNational University of IrelandGalwayIreland
  3. 3.School of PsychologyNational University of IrelandGalwayIreland

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