Advertisement

Chagas Disease Epidemiology in Central America: an Update

  • Jennifer K. PetersonEmail author
  • Kota Yoshioka
  • Ken Hashimoto
  • Angela Caranci
  • Nicole Gottdenker
  • Carlota Monroy
  • Azael Saldaña
  • Stanley Rodriguez
  • Patricia Dorn
  • Concepción Zúniga
Chagas (M Nolan, Section Editor)
  • 1 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Chagas

Abstract

Purpose of Review

Chagas disease is endemic to all seven Central American countries, where 12% of the population lives in areas where the disease is a risk. While neglect is a pervasive characteristic of Chagas disease in general, it tends to be especially overlooked in Central America, with more studies and resources devoted to the disease in South America. Here we report on the current epidemiological scenario of Chagas disease in Central America with the objective of presenting a panorama that includes national program details, recent morbidity data, new findings, and events relevant to the disease.

Recent Findings

Multinational initiatives and collaborations with external stakeholders that began around the beginning of this century led to the successful elimination of the vector species Rhodnius prolixus, which was last found in Guatemala in 2015. However, acute Chagas disease cases continue to be found in all countries with a surveillance system in place, mainly attributed to Trypanosoma cruzi transmission to humans by the native triatomine species Triatoma dimidiata and Rhodnius pallescens. Serological surveys targeting children have generally found varied T. cruzi infection prevalence, studies of transplacentally transmitted T. cruzi infection in the academic/public sectors have found a few cases in the region, and a new T. cruzi transmission focus was found in western Panama.

Summary

Chagas disease transmission and prevalence have been reduced in Central America over the past two decades, but there is still much progress to be made toward interruption of T. cruzi transmission to humans by native vector species. Other key areas for improvement are implementing screening for T. cruzi infection in pregnant women, improving reliability of diagnostic tests, expanding access to etiological treatment, and increasing availability and quality of data.

Keywords

Chagas disease Central America Trypanosoma cruzi Triatoma dimidiata Rhodnius pallescens Triatomine bugs Epidemiology Neglected tropical disease Vector-borne disease 

Abbreviations

ELISA

Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

IPCA

Initiative for Chagas Disease Control in Central America

IPCAM

Initiative for Chagas Disease Control in Central America and Mexico

IRS

Indoor residual spraying

MoH

Ministry of Health

PAHO

Pan American Health Organization

R. pallescens

Rhodnius pallescens

R. prolixus

Rhodnius prolixus

T. cruzi

Trypanosoma cruzi

T. dimidiata

Triatoma dimidiata

WHO

World Health Organization

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank Mr. Kim Bautista for providing information on Chagas disease in Belize and for providing suggestions for the Belize section of the manuscript, Dr. Erick Campos Fuentes for providing information on Chagas disease in Costa Rica, Dr. Andrea Urbina for reviewing the Costa Rica text, and Mr. Daniel Tobon for assistance with map creation. Dr. Azael Saldaña is a member of the Sistema Nacional de Investigación (SNI), SENACYT, Panamá.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance

  1. 1.
    Organización Panamericana de la Salud. Informe de la primera reunión de la comisión intergubernamental de la iniciativa de Centroamerica y Belize para la interrupción de la transmisión vectorial de la enfermedad de Chagas por Rhodnius prolixus , disminución de la infestación domiciliaria por Triatoma dimidiata , y eliminación de la transmisión transfusional del Trypanosoma cruzi. 1999. Report No.: OPS/HCP/HCT/145/99.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ponce C. Current situation of Chagas disease in Central America. Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz. 2007;102:41–4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Organización Panamericana de la Salud. La enfermedad de Chagas en El Salvador, evolución historica y desafíos para el control. San Salvador: OPS; 2010.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID). Programa regional para el control de la enfermedad de Chagas en América Latina. Iniciativa de bienes públicos regionales. 2010. Available from: https://www.paho.org/per/index.php?option=com_docman&view=download&category_slug=chagas-998&alias=260-programa-regional-para-control-enfermedad-chagas-america-latina-iniciativa-bienes-publicos-regionales-0&Itemid=1031. Accessed 5 Feb 2019.
  5. 5.
    Organización Panamericana de la Salud. XII reunión de la comisión intergubernamental de la iniciativa de Centroamérica (IPCA) para la interrupción de la transmisión vectorial y transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas. Honduras; 2010.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    World Health Organization. Chagas disease in Latin America: an epidemiological update based on the 2010 estimates. Wkly Epidemiol Rec. 2015;6:33–44.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Organización Panamericana de la Salud. Estimación cuantitativa de la enfermedad de Chagas en Las Américas. 2006. Report No.: OPS/HDM/CD/425–06.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Organización Panamericana de la Salud. Informe de la tercera reunión de la comisión intergubernamental de la iniciativa de Centroamérica y Belice para la interrupción de la transmisión vectorial de la enfermedad de Chagas por Rhodnius prolixus, disminución de la infestación domiciliaria por Triatoma dimidiata, y eliminación de la transmisión transfusional del Trypanosoma cruzi. 2001.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Herrera M. Chagas disease surveillance among blood donors Belize, 2010–2016. Belize Ministry of Health; 2017.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Sosa A. Central Medical Laboratory, Belize Ministry of Health. Chagas—Belize. Décimo Octava Reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental (CI) de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica y México (IPCAM) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas; 29–31 de Octubre de 2018. Tegucigalpa, Honduras.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Sosa A. Central Medical Laboratory, Belize Ministry of Health. Chagas en el banco de sangre—Belize. Décimo Octava Reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental (CI) de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica y México (IPCAM) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas; Tegucigalpa Honduras, 29 al 31 de octubre de 2018.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Sistema de Información Gerencial de Salud (SIGSA). Guatemala Ministerio de Salud. SIGSA | Enfermedades Transmitidas por Vectores, años 2012 al 2017. [cited 2019 Feb 5]. Available from: https://sigsa.mspas.gob.gt/datos-de-salud/morbilidad/enfermedades-transmitidas-por-vectores
  13. 13.
    Pan American Health Organization. Supply of blood for transfusion in Latin American and Caribbean countries, 2014 and 2015. Washington, D.C.: PAHO; 2017.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Programa Nacional de Medicina Transfusional y Bancos de Sangre, Guatemala Ministerio de Salud Pública y Asistencia Social. Reactividad en donantes de sangre a nivel nacional. Décimo Octava Reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental (CI) de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica y México (IPCAM) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas; 29–31 de Octubre de 2018. Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Accessed 20 Nov 2018.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Ministerio de Salud Gobierno de El Salvador. Enfermedad de Chagas, casos agudos, El Salvador 2014-2017. Décimo Octava Reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental (CI) de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica y México (IPCAM) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas, 29–31 de Octubre de 2018. Tegucigalpa.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Unidad de Vigilancia de la Salud, Secretaría de Salud. Gobierno de la República de Honduras. Décimo Octava Reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental (CI) de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica y México (IPCAM) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas. Décimo Octava Reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental (CI) de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica y México (IPCAM) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas; Tegucigalpa Honduras, 29 al 31 de Octubre de 2018.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Solórzano Ortiz E, Monroy Escobar MC, Carrillo Amaya KA, Zúniga C, Bazzani R. Situación actual de la enfermedad de Chagas en Centro América y Mexico. Laboratorio de Entomología Aplicada y Parasitología, Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala, International Development Research Center, Guatemala; 2016.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Corrêa Rodrigues VLC. Informe del estado de avances de la situación epidemiológica y de control de la enfermedad de Chagas en Honduras. Décimo Octava Reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental (CI) de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica y México (IPCAM) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas; 29–31 de Octubre de 2018. Tegucigalpa, Honduras.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Nicaragua Ministerio de Salud. Antecedentes, situación actual, avances hacia la eliminación y perspectivas de control de la Enfermedad de Chagas en Nicaragua. Décimo Octava Reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental (CI) de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica y México (IPCAM) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas; 29–31 de Octubre de 2018. Tegucigalpa, Honduras.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Costa Rica Ministerio de Salud. Memoria Institucional 2014–2018. San Jose: El Ministerio; 2018.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    CNRP-INCIENSA. Prevalencia de enfermedad de Chagas en donantes de sangre por año. CNRP, INCIENSA Costa Rica 2012-2017. 2018. Accessed 23 Oct 2018.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    República de Panamá, Ministerio de Salud, Dirección General de Salud, Departamento de Epidemiología. Boletín epidemiológico de enfermedad de Chagas; 2017. 28 de Febrero de 2018. Available from: http://www.minsa.gob.pa/sites/default/files/publicacion-general/boletin_chagas_2017_5.pdf.
  23. 23.
    Polonio R, Ramirez-Sierra MJ, Dumonteil E. Dynamics and distribution of house infestation by Triatoma dimidiata in Central and Southern Belize. Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2009;9:19–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Organización Panamericana de la Salud. Informe de la XIV Reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica (IPCA) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas. Ciudad de Belice, Belice, Noviembre 13–14, 2012.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    Jaramillo R, Schur J, Bryan JP, Pan AA. Prevalence of antibody to Trypanosoma cruzi in three populations in Belize. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1997;57:298–301.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Amnesty International. Home sweet home? Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador’s role in a deepening refugee crisis. 2016. Report No.: AMR 01/4865/2016. Available from: https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/AMR0148652016ENGLISH.PDF
  27. 27.
    UNAIDS. Country Factsheet: Belize. UNAIDS; 2017 [cited 2019 Feb 5]. Available from: http://www.unaids.org/en/regionscountries/countries/belize.
  28. 28.
    Pérez-Molina JA, Rodríguez-Guardado A, Soriano A, Pinazo M-J, Carrilero B, García-Rodríguez M, et al. Guidelines on the treatment of chronic coinfection by Trypanosoma cruzi and HIV outside endemic areas. HIV Clin Trials. 2011;12:287–98. Accessed 5 Feb 2019.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Pérez-Molina JA. Management of Trypanosoma cruzi coinfection in HIV-positive individuals outside endemic areas. Curr Opin Infect Dis. 2014;27:9–15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    de Almeida EA, Ramos Júnior AN, Correia D, Shikanai-Yasuda MA. Co-infection Trypanosoma cruzi/HIV: systematic review (1980-2010). Rev Soc Bras Med Trop. 2011;44:762–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Benchetrit AG, Fernández M, Bava AJ, Corti M, Porteiro N, Martínez PL. Clinical and epidemiological features of chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection in patients with HIV/AIDS in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Int J Infect Dis. 2018;67:118–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    Organización Panamericana de la Salud. Conclusiones y Recomendaciones de la décimo octava reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental (CI) de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica y Mexico (IPCAM) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional, y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas. Tegucigalpa, Honduras; 2018.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Bayer Pharma AG. Corporate communications. Argentina: Chagas disease—corporate social responsibility. Bayer. Available from: http://pharma.bayer.com/microsites/csr/reports/argentina_chagas_disease/.
  34. 34.
    Tabaru Y, Monroy C, Rodas A, Mejia M, Rosales R. The geographical distribution of vectors of Chagas’ disease and populations at risk of infection in Guatemala. Med Entomol Zool. 1999;50:9–17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. 35.
    Peterson JK, Hashimoto K, Yoshioka K, Dorn P, Gottdenker N, Caranci A, et al. Chagas disease in Central America: recent findings and current challenges in vector ecology and control. Curr Trop Med Rep. 2019.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s40475-019-00175-0.
  36. 36.
    Pan American Health Organization. Supply of blood for transfusion in Latin American and Caribbean countries 2010 and 2011. Washington DC: PAHO; 2013. p. 181.Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    Pan American Health Organization. Supply of blood for transfusion in Latin America and the Caribbean 2012 and 2013. Washington DC: PAHO; 2015.Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Chávez Vásquez E. Análisis de Chagas. Guatemala Ministerio de Salud Pública y Asistencia Social; 2016. Available from: http://epidemiologia.mspas.gob.gt/files/Publicaciones%202016/Salas%20Situacionales/An%C3%A1lisis%20de%20Chagas%202015.pdf. Accessed 28 Nov 2018.
  39. 39.
    Hernández Mack L. Informe Anual de la situación de las enfermedades transmisibles y no transmisibles prioritarias de vigilancia epidemiológica, Guatemala 2015. Guatemala Ministerio de Salud y Asistencia Social; 2016. p. 121. Accessed 7 Oct 2018.Google Scholar
  40. 40.
    Sistema de Información Gerencial de Salud (SIGSA). Guatemala Ministerio de Salud. SIGSA | Proyecciones de población años 2014 al 2018. [cited 2019 Feb 5]. Available from: https://sigsa.mspas.gob.gt/datos-de-salud/informacion-demografica/proyecciones-de-poblacion.
  41. 41.
    Monroy C. Universidad de San Carlos de Guatemala. Triatoma dimidiata. Su situación como vector y su control. Décimo Octava Reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental (CI) de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica y México (IPCAM) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas; 29–31 de Octubre de 2018. Tegucigalpa, Honduras.Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    • Juarez JG, Pennington PM, Bryan JP, Klein RE, Beard CB, Berganza E, et al. A decade of vector control activities: progress and limitations of Chagas disease prevention in a region of Guatemala with persistent Triatoma dimidiata infestation. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2018;12:e0006896. This work reviews vector control measures and results over the past decade in the highly endemic municipality of Comapa, in Jutiapa, Guatemala. The work covers the results of past serological and entomological surveys and provides complementary data from recent serological surveys in school children and women of child-bearing age. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. 43.
    • Pennington PM, Juárez JG, Arrivillaga MR, De Urioste-Stone SM, Doktor K, Bryan JP, et al. Towards Chagas disease elimination: Neonatal screening for congenital transmission in rural communities. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2017;11:e0005783. In this work, the researchers carried out a year-long investigation of the needs and customs of the local community in order to design and implement a campaign to promote screening of pregnant women and their neonates for T. cruzi in a transmission hotspot in Guatemala. In 2016, a community-based program to increase detection and treatment of transplacentally transmitted T. cruzi infection was implemented by the research team, and in the first year of the project, 3.9% (8/228) of pregnant women screened were diagnosed with T. cruzi , and seven of the eight babies born to T. cruzi -positive mothers were screened. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. 44.
    Abad-Franch F, Diotaiuti L, Gurgel-Gonçalves R, Gürtler RE. Certifying the interruption of Chagas disease transmission by native vectors: cui bono? Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz. 2013;108:251–4. Accessed 18 June 2018.Google Scholar
  45. 45.
    Alliances for Chagas elimination in Central America. IDRC—International Development Research Centre. 2019 [cited 2019 Feb 7]. Available from: https://www.idrc.ca/en/project/alliances-chagas-elimination-central-america.
  46. 46.
    Ponce C. Informe final del estudio de prevalencia de la enfermedad de Chagas en Honduras. Secretaría de Salud: Honduras; 1986.Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    Hashimoto K, Rhatigan J. Cases in Global Health Delivery: Chagas disease vector control in Honduras. Harvard Medical School; 2017. Report No.: GHD-037. Available from: http://www.globalhealthdelivery.org/files/ghd/files/ghd-037_chagas_case_1.pdf
  48. 48.
    Secretaría de Salud de Honduras. Dirección General de Promoción de la Salud, Programa Nacional de Prevención y Control, de la Enfermedad Chagas y la Agencia de Cooperación Internacional del Japón (JICA). Informe final del proyecto de control de la enfermedad de Chagas fase 2 (2008–2011). Tegucigalpa, Honduras; 2011. Available from: https://www.jica.go.jp/project/honduras/0701409/04/pdf/oritect_fase2_01.pdf.
  49. 49.
    • Buekens P, for the Congenital Chagas Working Group, López B, Graiff O, Ramírez-Sierra MJ, Sosa-Estani S, et al. Congenital transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in Argentina, Honduras, and Mexico: an observational prospective study. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2018;98:478–85. Although no transplacentally transmitted T. cruzi infections were found in Honduras during this study, it was the first published study of congenital Chagas disease in Honduras. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. 50.
    Secretária de Salud R de H. Plan estratégico para la prevención, atención, control y eliminación de enfermedades infecciosas desatendidas en Honduras (PEEDH). 2012. Available from: https://www.paho.org/hon/index.php?option=com_docman&view=download&alias=264-plan-estrategico-enfermedades-infecciosas-desatendidas-honduras-2012&category_slug=enfermedades-transmisibles&Itemid=211.
  51. 51.
    Cedillos RA, Romero JE, Sasagawa E. Elimination of Rhodnius prolixus in El Salvador, Central America. Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz. 2012;107:1068–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  52. 52.
    El Salvador Ministerio de Salud. Plan nacional para la prevención, control y eliminación de las enfermedades infecciosas desatendidas, 1st edn. San Salvador; 2014. Available from: http://www.salud.gob.sv/regulación/default.asp.
  53. 53.
    El Salvador Ministerio de Salud. Norma técnica para las enfermedades transmitidas por vectores y zoonosis. Mendoza Castro EA, editor. Diario oficial de la republica de El Salvador en la America Central. 2016;413. Available from: http://asp.salud.gob.sv/regulacion/pdf/norma/norma_tecnica_enfermedades_transmitidas_vectores_y_zoonosis.pdf.
  54. 54.
    Japanese International Cooperation Agency. Buenas prácticas en el control de la enfermedad de Chagas en Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras y Nicaragua 2000–2014. Hashimoto K, editor. 2014. Available from: http://c3.usac.edu.gt/lenap.usac.edu.gt/public_html/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Buenas-Practicas-Chagas-GUT-ELS-HON-NIC-2000-2014-para-Web.pdf.
  55. 55.
    Salvatella R, Irabedra P, Castellanos LG. Interruption of vector transmission by native vectors and “the art of the possible”. Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz. 2014;109:122–30.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. 56.
    Ministerio de Salud, Gobierno de El Salvador. Chagas en donantes de sangre y transfusiones sanguíneas. Décimo Octava Reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental (CI) de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica y México (IPCAM) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas, 29–31 de Octubre de 2018. Tegucigalpa, Honduras.Google Scholar
  57. 57.
    • Sasagawa E, Hernández Ramírez MA, Kita K, Romero Chévez JE, Corado Soriano EY, Cedillos RA, et al. Mother-to-child transmission of Chagas disease in El Salvador. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2015;93:326–33. This work is the first published study in which an infant born with transplacental T. cruzi infection was diagnosed and treated in El Salvador. CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  58. 58.
    Ministerio de Salud, Nicaragua (MINSA), Agencia de Cooperación Internacional de Japón (JICA). Informe final del proyecto para el fortalecimiento de las actividades de vigilancia y control de la enfermedad de Chagas en Nicaragua (2009–2014). 2014. Available from: https://www.jica.go.jp/project/nicaragua/001/materials/ku57pq0000126ws5-att/informe_final_proyecto_chagas.pdf.
  59. 59.
    Yoshioka K, Tercero D, Pérez B, Lugo E. Rhodnius prolixus en Nicaragua: distribución geográfica, control y vigilancia entre 1998 y 2009. Rev Panam Salud Publica. 2011;30:439–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. 60.
    Pan American Health Organization. Area of Health System Based on Primary Health Care. Medicines and Health Technologies. Supply of blood transfusion in the Caribbean and Latin American Countries 2006, 2007, 2008 and 2009: progress since 2005 of the regional plan of action for transfusion safety. Washington, D.C.: PAHO; 2010.Google Scholar
  61. 61.
    Nicaragua Gobierno de Reconciliación y Unidad Nacional. Ministerio de Salud. Normativa 110: Norma técnica para el abordaje de la prevención, control y atención de la enfermedad de Chagas (Tripanosomiasis Americana). c: Ministerio de Salud (MINSA); 2013.Google Scholar
  62. 62.
    Nicaragua. Gobierno de Reconciliación y Unidad Nacional. Ministerio de Salud. Normativa 111: Manual de procedimientos para el abordaje de la prevención, control y atención de la enfermedad de Chagas (Tripanomiasis Americana). Managua: Ministerio de Salud (MINSA); 2013.Google Scholar
  63. 63.
    Nicaragua Ministerio de Salud. Resumen de avances 2012 Nicaragua. XV Reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental (CI) de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica y México (IPCAM) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas; 22 de Octubre de 2013. Ciudad de Mexico, Mexico.Google Scholar
  64. 64.
    Pan American Health Organization. Country report: Nicaragua. Health in the Americas 2017. 2017 [cited 2019 Feb 6]. Available from: https://www.paho.org/salud-en-las-americas-2017/?p=4286.
  65. 65.
    Programa Nacional de Chagas de Nicaragua/Dr. Felipe Guhl. Informe del estado de avances de la situación epidemiológica y de control de la enfermedad de Chagas en Nicaragua. Décimo Octava Reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental (CI) de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica y México (IPCAM) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas; 29 al 31 de Octubre de 2018, Tegucigalpa, Honduras.Google Scholar
  66. 66.
    Montoya Pérez A. Serodiagnosis kit of human leptospirosis and Chagas disease. {Innovation for Development and South-South Cooperation (IDEASS) Nicaragua}; 2005. Available from: http://www.ideassonline.org/public/pdf/br_34_76.pdf.
  67. 67.
    Hanada K, Yamada T, Kashiwazaki Y, Yamawaki F, López PE, Alcira Molina V. Summary of terminal evaluation, Chagas’ Disease Control Project, Nicaragua. Japanese International Cooperation Agency (JICA); 2014. Available from: https://www.jica.go.jp/english/our_work/evaluation/tech_and_grant/project/term/latin_america/c8h0vm000001rz7x-att/nicaragua_2013_01.pdf.
  68. 68.
    Organización Panamericana de la Salud. Iniciativa de los países de América Central, para la Interrupción de la transmisión vectorial y transfusional de la enfermedad de Chagas (IPCA). Historia de 12 años de una iniciativa subregional 1998–2010/Representación de la OPS/OMS en Honduras. 2011.Google Scholar
  69. 69.
    Organización Panamericana de la Salud. Octava reunión de la comisión intergubernamental de la iniciativa de Centroamérica y Belice para la interrupción de la transmisión vectorial de la enfermedad de Chagas por Rhodnius prolixus, disminución de la infestación domiciliaria por Triatoma dimidiata, y eliminación de la transmisión transfusional del Trypanosoma cruzi. 2006. Report No.: OPS/DPC/CD/366/06.Google Scholar
  70. 70.
    Organización Panamericana de la Salud. Informe de la XIII Reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica (IPCA) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas. 2012. Report No.: HSD/CD/001–12.Google Scholar
  71. 71.
    Chinchilla M, Castro A, Reyes L, Guerrero O, Calderón-Arguedas O, Troyo A. Enfermedad de Chagas en Costa Rica: Estudio comparativo en dos épocas diferentes. Parasitología latinoamericana. 12/2006 [cited 2018 Oct 7];61. Available from: http://www.scielo.cl/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0717-77122006000200007&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en.
  72. 72.
    Zeledón R. Some historical facts and recent issues related to the presence of Rhodnius prolixus (Stal 1859) (Hemiptera:Reduviidae) in Central America. Entomol Vectores. 2004;11:233–46.Google Scholar
  73. 73.
    Zeledón R, Solano G, Burstin L, Swartzwelder JC. Epidemiological pattern of Chagas’ disease in an endemic area of Costa Rica. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1975;24:214–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  74. 74.
    Mata Somarribas C, Calvo Fonseca N. Morfología distintiva y clave pictórica para la subfamilia Triatominae (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) en América Central. Instituto Costarricense de Investigación y Enseñaza en Nutrición y Salud (INCIENSA); 2015.Google Scholar
  75. 75.
    CNRP-INCIENSAS. Casos agudos de Enfermedad de Chagas. Costa Rica 2003-2018, CNRP; 2018.Google Scholar
  76. 76.
    Organización Panamericana de Salud. Iniciativa de Centroamérica y Belice para la interrupción de la transmisión vectorial de la enfermedad de Chagas por Rhodnius prolixus, disminución de la infestación domiciliaria por Triatoma dimidiata, y eliminación de la transmisión transfusional del Trypanosoma cruzi. Taller para el establecimiento de pautas técnicas en el control de Triatoma dimidiata. 11–13 Marzo de 2002. San Salvador, El Salvador. Report No.: OPS/HCP/HCT/214/02. Available from: https://www.paho.org/uru/index.php?option=com_docman&view=download&alias=58-taller-para-el-establecimiento-de-pautas-tecnicas-en-el-control-de-tiatoma-dimidiata&category_slug=manuales-y-guias&Itemid=307.
  77. 77.
    Ministerio de Salud Costa Rica. Memoria Institucional 2016. San Jose: El Ministerio; 2017.Google Scholar
  78. 78.
    Costa Rica Ministerio de Salud. Norma de atención integral de la enfermedad de Chagas. 2012. Report No.: CIE-10:B57. Available from: http://www.inciensa.sa.cr/vigilancia_epidemiologica/Protocolos_Vigilancia/37269%20Norma%20Atencion%20Integral%20de%20la%20Enfermedad%20de%20Chagas.pdf.
  79. 79.
    Zeledón R, Marín F, Calvo N, Lugo E, Valle S. Distribution and ecological aspects of Rhodnius pallescens in Costa Rica and Nicaragua and their epidemiological implications. Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz Fundação Oswaldo Cruz. 2006;101:75–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  80. 80.
    Nájera AA. Costa Rica Ministerio de Salud. Informe enfermedad de Chagas Costa Rica 2018. Décimo Octava Reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental (CI) de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica y México (IPCAM) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas; 29 al 31 de Octubre de 2018. Tegucigalpa.Google Scholar
  81. 81.
    Campos-Fuentes E, Calvo-Fonseca N. Confirmación diagnóstica del tamizaje de enfermedad de Chagas en Costa rica. Rev Costarric Salud Pública. January-June 2013;22:4–8.Google Scholar
  82. 82.
    Zeledon R. Chagas disease: an ecological appraisal with special emphasis on its insect vectors. Annu Rev Entomol. 1981;26:101–33.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  83. 83.
    Zeledón R, Ugalde JA, Paniagua LA. Entomological and ecological aspects of six sylvatic species of triatomines (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) from the collection of the National Biodiversity Institute of Costa Rica, Central America. Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz. 2001;96:757–64.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  84. 84.
    Zeledón R, Rojas JC, Urbina A, Cordero M, Gamboa SH, Lorosa ES, et al. Ecological control of Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille, 1811): five years after a Costa Rican pilot project. Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz. 2008;103:619–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  85. 85.
    Zeledón R, Ponce C, Méndez-Galván JF. Epidemiological, social, and control determinants of Chagas disease in Central America and Mexico—group discussion. Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz. 2007;102:45–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  86. 86.
    Zeledón R, Mena C. Primer caso de enfermedad de Chagas de la Provincia de Alajuela. Rev Biol Trop. 1953;1:55–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  87. 87.
    Vargas LG, Zeledón R. The role of dirt floors and of firewood in rural dwellings in the epidemiology of Chagas’ disease in Costa Rica. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1984;33:232–5.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  88. 88.
    Zeledón R, Rojas JC. Environmental management for the control of Triatoma dimidiata (Latreille, 1811), (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in Costa Rica: a pilot project. Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz. 2006;101:379–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  89. 89.
    Zeledón R, Morales JA, Scally M, Torres J, Alfaro S, Gutiérrez H, et al. Hallazgo de Rhodnius pallescens Barber, 1932 (Reduviidae: Triatominae) en Palmeras (Attalea butyracea) en el norte de Costa Rica. Boletín de Malariología y Salud Ambiental. Instituto de Altos Estudios en Salud Pública Dr. Arnoldo Gabaldon. 2006;46:15–20.Google Scholar
  90. 90.
    Zeledón R, Cordero M, Marroquín R, Lorosa ES. Life cycle of Triatoma ryckmani (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in the laboratory, feeding patterns in nature and experimental infection with Trypanosoma cruzi. Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz. 2010;105:99–102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  91. 91.
    Vargas LG, Zeledon R. Effect of fasting on Trypanosoma cruzi infection in Triatoma dimidiata (Hemiptera: Reduviidae). J Med Entomol. 1985;22:683.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  92. 92.
    Zeledón R, Blanco E. Relaciones huesped-parasito en Tripanosomiasis Rangeli I. Infección intestinal y hemolinfactica comparativa de Rhodnius prolixus y Triatoma infestans. Rev Biol Trop. 1965;13:143–58.Google Scholar
  93. 93.
    Zeledón R, de Monge E. Natural immunity of the bug Triatoma infestans to the protozoan Trypanosoma rangeli. J Invertebr Pathol. 1966;8:420–4.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  94. 94.
    Bice DE, Zeledon R. Comparison of infectivity of strains of Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas, 1909). J Parasitol. 1970;56:663–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  95. 95.
    Galvão C, Carcavallo R, Rocha DDS, Jurberg J. A checklist of the current valid species of the subfamily Triatominae Jeannel, 1919 (Hemiptera, Reduviidae) and their geographical distribution, with nomenclatural and taxonomic notes. Zootaxa. 2003;202:1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  96. 96.
    Ministerio de Salud de Panamá. Caja de Seguro Social, Organización Panamericana de la Salud, Organización Mundial de la Salud. Guía para el abordaje integral de la enfermedad de Chagas en la república de Panamá. 2012. Available from: http://www.minsa.gob.pa/sites/default/files/publicacion-general/guia_chagas_ops-minsa-css.pdf.
  97. 97.
    Abad-Franch F, Lima MM, Sarquis O, Gurgel-Gonçalves R, Sanchez-Martin MJ, Calzada JE, et al. On palms, bugs, and Chagas disease in the Americas. Acta Trop. 2015;151:126–41.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  98. 98.
    Sousa OE. Anotaciones sobre la enfermedad de Chagas en Panamá. Frecuencia y distribución de Trypanosoma cruzi y Trypanosoma rangeli. Rev Biol Trop. 1972;20:167–79.Google Scholar
  99. 99.
    Organización Panamericana de la Salud. Informe de la cuarta reunión de la comisión intergubernamental de la iniciativa de Centroamérica y Belice para la interrupción de la transmisión vectorial de la enfermedad de Chagas por Rhodnius prolixus, disminución de la infestación domiciliaria por Triatoma dimidiata, y eliminación de la transmisión transfusional del Trypanosoma cruzi. 2002. Report No.: OPS/HCP/HCT/202/02.Google Scholar
  100. 100.
    Sousa O, Johnson CM. Prevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli in triatomines (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) collected in the Republic of Panama. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1973;22:18–23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  101. 101.
    Sousa OE, Johnson CM. Frequency and distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma rangeli in the Republic of Panama. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1971;20:3–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  102. 102.
    Pineda V, Montalvo E, Alvarez D, Santamaría AM, Calzada JE, Saldaña A. Feeding sources and trypanosome infection index of Rhodnius pallescens in a Chagas disease endemic area of Amador County, Panama. Rev Inst Med Trop Sao Paulo. 2008;50:113–6.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  103. 103.
    Calzada JE, Pineda V, Montalvo E, Alvarez D, Santamaría AM, Samudio F, et al. Human trypanosome infection and the presence of intradomicile Rhodnius pallescens in the western border of the Panama Canal. Panama Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2006;74:762–5.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  104. 104.
    Saldaña A, Pineda V, Martinez I, Santamaria G, Santamaria AM, Miranda A, et al. A new endemic focus of Chagas disease in the northern region of Veraguas Province, Western Half Panama, Central America. PLoS One. 2012;7:e34657.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  105. 105.
    Servicio Internacional de Migración, Gobierno de la República de Panamá. Movimiento migratorio diciembre 2018. 2018. Available from: http://www.migracion.gob.pa/inicio/estadisticas. https://www.migracion.gob.pa/images/pdf/MOVIMIENTO_MIGRATORIO_DICIEMBRE_2018.pdf.
  106. 106.
    Sullivan MP. Panama: political and economic conditions and US relations. Congressional Research Service; 2012. Report No.: 7–5700. Available from: https://fas.org/sgp/crs/row/RL30981.pdf
  107. 107.
    Roberto Salvatella, Programa Regional de Chagas, Organización Panamericana de Salud (ops)/Organización Mundial de Salud (OMS). Informe del estado de avances 2017–2018 de la situación epidemiológica y de control de la Enfermedad de Chagas. Renovación de metas y objetivos de IPCAM: prevención, control y atención médica de la enfermedad de Chagas. Décimo Octava Reunión de la Comisión Intergubernamental (CI) de la Iniciativa de los Países de Centroamérica y México (IPCAM) para la Interrupción de la Transmisión Vectorial, Transfusional y Atención Médica de la Enfermedad de Chagas; 29 al 31 de Octubre de 2018. Tegucigalpa, Honduras.Google Scholar
  108. 108.
    Pan American Health Organization. EMTCT plus. Framework for elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV, syphilis, hepatitis B, and Chagas. PAHO: Washington, D.C; 2017.Google Scholar
  109. 109.
    Guzmán-Gómez D, López-Monteon A, de la Soledad Lagunes-Castro M, Álvarez-Martínez C, Hernández-Lutzon MJ, Dumonteil E, et al. Highly discordant serology against Trypanosoma cruzi in Central Veracruz, Mexico: role of the antigen used for diagnostic. Parasit Vectors. 2015;8:466.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  110. 110.
    Atsma F, de Vegt F. The healthy donor effect: a matter of selection bias and confounding. Transfusion. 2011;51:1883–5.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer K. Peterson
    • 1
    Email author
  • Kota Yoshioka
    • 2
  • Ken Hashimoto
    • 3
  • Angela Caranci
    • 4
  • Nicole Gottdenker
    • 5
  • Carlota Monroy
    • 6
  • Azael Saldaña
    • 7
  • Stanley Rodriguez
    • 8
  • Patricia Dorn
    • 9
  • Concepción Zúniga
    • 10
  1. 1.Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology & Informatics, Perelman School of MedicineUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Doctor of Public Health ProgramHarvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthBostonUSA
  3. 3.Independent ScholarKakogawaJapan
  4. 4.Northwest Mosquito and Vector Control DistrictCoronaUSA
  5. 5.Department of Veterinary PathologyUniversity of Georgia College of Veterinary MedicineAthensUSA
  6. 6.Laboratory of Applied Entomology and Parasitology (LENAP), Pharmacy FacultySan Carlos UniversityGuatemala CityGuatemala
  7. 7.Instituto Conmemorativo Gorgas de Estudios de la Salud (ICGES)Panama CityPanama
  8. 8.Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo En Salud CENSALUDUniversidad de El SalvadorSan SalvadorEl Salvador
  9. 9.Department of Biological SciencesLoyola University New OrleansNew OrleansUSA
  10. 10.Chief of Health SurveillanceHospital EscuelaTegucigalpaHonduras

Personalised recommendations