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Parametric optimization of the aluminium nanocomposites wear rate

  • Sandra Veličković
  • Blaža Stojanović
  • Miroslav Babić
  • Aleksandar Vencl
  • Ilija Bobić
  • Gabriella Vadászné Bognár
  • Filip Vučetić
Technical Paper
  • 7 Downloads

Abstract

The optimization of wear rate of the nanocomposites with A356 aluminium alloy matrix, reinforced with silicon carbide nanoparticles, was performed through the analysis of the following influences: wt% of the reinforcement, normal load and sliding speed. The nanocomposites were produced by the compocasting process with mechanical alloying preprocessing (ball milling). Three different amounts of SiC nanoparticles, with the same average size of 50 nm, were used as reinforcement, i.e. 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5 wt%. Tribological tests were performed on block-on-disc tribometer (line contact) under lubricated sliding conditions, at two sliding speeds (0.25 and 1 m/s), two normal loads (40 and 100 N) and at sliding distance of 1000 m. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to determine the influence of different parameters on wear value of tested nanocomposites. It was noticed from ANOVA analysis that normal load, with 33.39%, is the most significant factor affecting the wear rate of nanocomposites. The amount of reinforcement, with 28.90%, also has a significant influence on the wear rate, while the influence of sliding speed, with 23.82%, is smaller. It was found that the prediction of wear rate, by using regression model and Taguchi analysis, were close to the experimental values.

Keywords

A356 alloy Nanocomposite Compocasting Wear rate Taguchi method ANOVA 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work has been performed as a part of activities within the Projects TR 35021 and TR 34028. These projects are supported by the Republic of Serbia, Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, whose financial help is gratefully acknowledged. Collaboration through the bilateral Project No. 451-03-02294/2015-09/9 and TÉT_16-1-2016-0164 between Republic of Serbia and Hungary is also acknowledged.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© The Brazilian Society of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandra Veličković
    • 1
  • Blaža Stojanović
    • 1
  • Miroslav Babić
    • 1
  • Aleksandar Vencl
    • 2
    • 5
  • Ilija Bobić
    • 3
  • Gabriella Vadászné Bognár
    • 4
  • Filip Vučetić
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of EngineeringUniversity of KragujevacKragujevacSerbia
  2. 2.Faculty of Mechanical EngineeringUniversity of BelgradeBelgradeSerbia
  3. 3.Department of Materials Science, Institute of Nuclear Sciences “Vinca”University of BelgradeBelgradeSerbia
  4. 4.Institute of Machine and Product DesignUniversity of MiskolcMiskolc-EgyetemvarosHungary
  5. 5.South Ural State UniversityChelyabinskRussia

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