Semi-empirical model on MRR and overcut in WEDM process of pure titanium using multi-objective desirability approach

Technical Paper

Abstract

Titanium and its alloys have been experiencing extensive development over the past few decades stimulated by a series of their unique properties, i.e. high strength to weight ratio maintained at elevated temperature, high hot hardness, high fracture resistance, and exceptional resistance to corrosion at temperature below 500 °C. Machining of titanium, however, is considered as cumbersome with the conventional manufacturing practices, and there is a critical need for developing and establishing cost-effective methods of machining. This research work is mainly focused on the effect of WEDM parameters, such as pulse on time, pulse off time, peak current, spark gap voltage, wire feed rate and wire tension has been varied to investigate their effect on material removal rate and overcut for pure titanium. The experiments are planned, conducted, and analyzed through response surface methodology. An attempt has also been made to construct a micro-model for prediction of material removal rate using dimensional analysis. The predictions from this model have been validated by conducting experiments.

Keywords

WEDM Titanium Response surface methodology Material removal rate Overcut Desirability function 

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Copyright information

© The Brazilian Society of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringM.M. UniversityMullana-AmbalaIndia
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringThapar UniversityPatialaIndia
  3. 3.Department of Mechanical EngineeringN.I.TKurukshetraIndia

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