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High Blood Pressure & Cardiovascular Prevention

, Volume 25, Issue 4, pp 401–405 | Cite as

Is it Possible to Significantly Modify Blood Pressure with a Combined Nutraceutical on Top of a Healthy Diet? The Results of a Pilot Clinical Trial

  • Arrigo F. G. Cicero
  • Alessandro Colletti
  • Federica Fogacci
  • Marilisa Bove
  • Marina Giovannini
  • Claudio Borghi
Original Article
  • 21 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Nutraceuticals in Hypertension & Cardiovascular Prevention

Abstract

Introduction

Beyond the well-known effects on blood pressure (BP) of the dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) and the Mediterranean diets associated to a correct lifestyle, often a lifestyle change is not simple and can show only long-time results: in this sense, a possible support might be derived from the use of some anti-hypertensive supplements or nutraceuticals, which may provide a significant reduction in blood pressure.

Aim

We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in a group of 36 pre-hypertensive and first-degree hypertensive patients.

Methods

The treatment period with a mix of bioactive substances (BPLN®, containing a donor of nitric oxide, magnesium, and vitamins) or placebo was 16-week long and was preceded by 4 weeks of diet stabilization.

Results

At the end of the intervention, patients treated with the nutraceutical product showed a significant reduction of all morning pressure parameters and of evening systolic blood pressure, both versus the baseline and versus the group treated with placebo. These effects were maintained even after the first 16 weeks of treatment, confirming that the preliminary results were not due to simple changes in volume and do not lead to adaptation/tachyphylaxis. No patient complained of any side effects while taking the active treatment and placebo.

Conclusions

The tested nutraceutical composite reduces systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the medium term, leading to a significant reduction in the estimated cardiovascular risk in a sample of patients with pre-hypertension or first-degree hypertension.

Keywords

Hypertension Blood pressure Dietary supplements Nutraceuticals Clinical evidence Clinical trial 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding

No specific funding were provided for the present study.

Conflict of Interest

The authors state that they have not any conflict of interest to declare.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arrigo F. G. Cicero
    • 1
  • Alessandro Colletti
    • 1
  • Federica Fogacci
    • 1
  • Marilisa Bove
    • 1
  • Marina Giovannini
    • 1
  • Claudio Borghi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical and Surgical SciencesUniversity of BolognaBolognaItaly

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