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Sports Medicine

, Volume 48, Issue 12, pp 2887–2889 | Cite as

Author’s Reply to Kitic: Comment on: “Association Between Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia and Intestinal Permeability: A Systematic Review”

  • Washington Pires
  • Samuel Penna Wanner
  • Danusa Dias Soares
  • Cândido Celso Coimbra
Letter to the Editor
  • 43 Downloads

Dear Editor,

We appreciate the interest in our recent systematic review [1] and welcome the opportunity to reply to Dr. Cecilia Kitic [2], who argued that the strength of the association between exercise hyperthermia and intestinal permeability was artificially increased by the incorrect exclusion of an eligible study [3] and the inclusion of resting measures of core body temperature (TCORE) and the lactulose-to-rhamnose ratio. We disagree with the comments made by Dr. Kitic [2], and our reply to them is based on five lines of reasoning.

Firstly, we are sorry for the mistake regarding the method used by Shing et al. [3] to measure intestinal permeability. We also failed to correctly explain the reason for excluding this study from the correlation analysis. The study was excluded because the absolute values of the lactulose-to-rhamnose ratio were not reported at all in the manuscript. The only numerical statement regarding the ratio was given on page 99: “The ratio of...

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding

No sources of funding were used to assist in the preparation of this letter.

Conflicts of interest

Washington Pires, Samuel Wanner, Danusa Soares, and Cândido Coimbra have no conflicts of interest relevant to the content of this letter.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Washington Pires
    • 1
  • Samuel Penna Wanner
    • 2
  • Danusa Dias Soares
    • 2
  • Cândido Celso Coimbra
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Physical Education,Institute of Life SciencesUniversidade Federal de Juiz de ForaGovernador ValadaresBrazil
  2. 2.Department of Physical Education, School of Physical Education, Physiotherapy and Occupational TherapyUniversidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo HorizonteBrazil
  3. 3.Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Institute of Biological SciencesUniversidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo HorizonteBrazil

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