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Understanding Vertical Jump Potentiation: A Deterministic Model

Abstract

This review article discusses previous postactivation potentiation (PAP) literature and provides a deterministic model for vertical jump (i.e., squat jump, countermovement jump, and drop/depth jump) potentiation. There are a number of factors that must be considered when designing an effective strength–power potentiation complex (SPPC) focused on vertical jump potentiation. Sport scientists and practitioners must consider the characteristics of the subject being tested and the design of the SPPC itself. Subject characteristics that must be considered when designing an SPPC focused on vertical jump potentiation include the individual’s relative strength, sex, muscle characteristics, neuromuscular characteristics, current fatigue state, and training background. Aspects of the SPPC that must be considered for vertical jump potentiation include the potentiating exercise, level and rate of muscle activation, volume load completed, the ballistic or non-ballistic nature of the potentiating exercise, and the rest interval(s) used following the potentiating exercise. Sport scientists and practitioners should design and seek SPPCs that are practical in nature regarding the equipment needed and the rest interval required for a potentiated performance. If practitioners would like to incorporate PAP as a training tool, they must take the athlete training time restrictions into account as a number of previous SPPCs have been shown to require long rest periods before potentiation can be realized. Thus, practitioners should seek SPPCs that may be effectively implemented in training and that do not require excessive rest intervals that may take away from valuable training time. Practitioners may decrease the necessary time needed to realize potentiation by improving their subject’s relative strength.

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Correspondence to Timothy J. Suchomel.

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Timothy Suchomel, Hugh Lamont, and Gavin Moir declare that they have no conflicts of interest relevant to the content of this review.

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Suchomel, T.J., Lamont, H.S. & Moir, G.L. Understanding Vertical Jump Potentiation: A Deterministic Model. Sports Med 46, 809–828 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s40279-015-0466-9

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Keywords

  • Maximal Voluntary Contraction
  • Vertical Jump
  • Rest Interval
  • Jump Height
  • Pennation Angle