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Pediatric Drugs

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 247–253 | Cite as

Human Papillomavirus-16/18 AS04-Adjuvanted Vaccine (Cervarix®): A Guide to Its Two-Dose Schedule in Girls Aged 9–14 Years in the EU

  • Katherine A. Lyseng-WilliamsonEmail author
Adis Drug Clinical Q&A

Abstract

A two-dose vaccination schedule for the human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine is approved for the prevention of premalignant cervical lesions and cervical cancer causally related to certain oncogenic HPV types in girls aged 9–14 years in countries in the EU and elsewhere. In this patient population, the two-dose schedule elicited a high immunogenic response that matched that of the three-dose schedule in women aged 15–25 years and, therefore, was inferred to provide clinical protection against oncogenic HPV cervical infection and, consequently, against precancerous lesions and cervical cancer.

Keywords

Cervical Cancer Anogenital Wart ELISA Unit Premalignant Cervical Lesion PBNA 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Disclosure

The preparation of this review was not supported by any external funding. The author has requested that GSK reviews this article in an advisory capacity as part of the peer review process. GSK’s review has been limited to the data related to GSK’s vaccine; the author retains sole responsibility for the scope and content of the article; changes resulting from comments received from GSK were made by the author on the basis of scientific and editorial merit.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.AdisNorth ShoreNew Zealand

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