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Drugs

, Volume 78, Issue 14, pp 1489–1500 | Cite as

Capsaicin 8% Dermal Patch: A Review in Peripheral Neuropathic Pain

  • Hannah A. Blair
Adis Drug Evaluation

Abstract

The adhesive capsaicin dermal patch (Qutenza®) delivers a high concentration (8% w/w) of synthetic capsaicin, a highly selective agonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV-1), directly to the site of pain. The capsaicin 8% dermal patch is indicated in the EU for the treatment of peripheral neuropathic pain (PNP) in adults, either alone or in combination with other medicinal products for pain. In patients with painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy, a single 30-min application of the capsaicin 8% dermal patch provided 12 weeks of pain relief and improved sleep quality compared with placebo. Repeat treatment with the capsaicin 8% dermal patch plus standard of care over 52 weeks provided sustained pain relief, with no negative neurological effects compared with standard of care alone. The capsaicin 8% dermal patch was non-inferior to oral pregabalin in relieving pain in patients with non-diabetic PNP, with a faster onset of action and greater treatment satisfaction. A single 60-min application of the capsaicin 8% dermal patch provided rapid and sustained pain relief in patients with postherpetic neuralgia. Results in patients with HIV-associated neuropathy were equivocal, with a significant improvement in pain intensity observed in one trial, but not in the other. The capsaicin 8% dermal patch was generally well tolerated; transient application-site reactions were the most common adverse events. In conclusion, the capsaicin 8% dermal patch is a useful addition to the treatment options currently available for patients with PNP.

Notes

Acknowledgements

During the peer review process, the manufacturer of capsaicin 8% dermal patch was also offered an opportunity to review this article. Changes resulting from comments received were made on the basis of scientific and editorial merit.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding

The preparation of this review was not supported by any external funding.

Conflicts of Interest

Hannah Blair is a salaried employee of Adis/Springer, is responsible for the article content and declares no relevant conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.SpringerAucklandNew Zealand

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