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Drugs

, Volume 78, Issue 4, pp 495–504 | Cite as

Brodalumab: A Review in Moderate to Severe Plaque Psoriasis

  • Hannah A. Blair
Adis Drug Evaluation
  • 532 Downloads

Abstract

Brodalumab (Kyntheum®) is a human anti-interleukin-17 receptor A (IL-17RA) monoclonal antibody available for use in patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. In the phase III AMAGINE trials in this patient population, 12 weeks of induction therapy with subcutaneous brodalumab was superior to placebo in terms of the proportion of patients with ≥ 75% improvement in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (PASI 75) and the proportion of patients with a static Physician Global Assessment score of 0 or 1. Brodalumab was also superior to ustekinumab for PASI 100 (i.e. complete skin clearance) at week 12. Health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) outcomes improved to a significantly greater extent with brodalumab than with placebo. Moreover, brodalumab was more effective than placebo in patients with difficult-to-treat nail or scalp psoriasis. Brodalumab was generally well tolerated, with low rates of immunogenicity. Efficacy was sustained and brodalumab remained well tolerated during up to 52 weeks of maintenance therapy. Thus, subcutaneous brodalumab is a useful addition to the treatment options currently available for patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

Notes

Acknowledgements

During the peer review process, the manufacturer of brodalumab was also offered an opportunity to review this article. Changes resulting from comments received were made on the basis of scientific and editorial merit.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding

The preparation of this review was not supported by any external funding.

Conflicts of interest

Hannah Blair is a salaried employee of Adis/Springer, is responsible for the article content and declares no relevant conflicts of interest.

Additional information about this Adis Drug Review can be found at http://www.medengine.com/Redeem/C5FCF0605A157671.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.SpringerAucklandNew Zealand

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