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Drugs

, Volume 78, Issue 4, pp 479–493 | Cite as

Ferric Carboxymaltose: A Review in Iron Deficiency

  • Lesley J. Scott
Adis Drug Evaluation
  • 461 Downloads

Abstract

Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (Ferinject®; Injectafer®) is a colloidal solution of nanoparticles which consist of a polynuclear iron (III)-(oxyhydr)oxide core stabilized by carboxymaltose and may be given as a single high-dose, 15-min infusion. This article reviews the clinical use of ferric carboxymaltose in various patient populations with iron deficiency (ID) [± anaemia] and briefly summarizes its pharmacological properties. Based on extensive experience in the clinical trial and real-world settings, ferric carboxymaltose is an effective and generally well tolerated treatment for rapidly replenishing iron stores and correcting anaemia in patients with ID (± anaemia) of various aetiologies, including patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease or perioperative anaemia, and women with ID during pregnancy, postpartum or associated with heavy uterine bleeding. As it may be given as a single high-dose infusion, ferric carboxymaltose has the potential to provide cost savings from a healthpayer perspective. Thus, ferric carboxymaltose remains an important option for the treatment of ID in adults and, where approved, children aged ≥ 14 years, when oral iron preparations are ineffective or cannot be used.

Notes

Acknowledgements

During the peer review process, the manufacturer of ferric carboxymaltose was also offered an opportunity to review this article. Changes resulting from comments received were made on the basis of scientific and editorial merit.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding

The preparation of this review was not supported by any external funding.

Conflict of interest

Lesley Scott is a salaried employee of Adis/Springer, is responsible for the article content and declares no relevant conflicts of interest.

Additional information about this Adis Drug Review can be found at http://www.medengine.com/Redeem/312DF06004B89E77.

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© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.SpringerAucklandNew Zealand

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