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Drugs

, Volume 77, Issue 3, pp 237–245 | Cite as

Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cells: Lessons Learned from Targeting of CD19 in B-Cell Malignancies

  • Kevin A. Hay
  • Cameron J. Turtle
Current Opinion
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Immuno-Oncology

Abstract

Adoptive immunotherapy with chimeric antigen receptor-modified (CAR)-T cells is a rapidly growing therapeutic approach to treating patients with refractory cancer, with over 100 clinical trials in various malignancies in progress. The enthusiasm for CAR-T cells has been driven by the clinical success of CD19-targeted CAR-T cell therapy in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and the promising data in B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Despite the success of targeting CD19 with CAR-T cells in early clinical studies, many challenges remain to improve outcomes, reduce toxicity, and determine the appropriate settings for CAR-T cell immunotherapy. Reviewing the lessons learned thus far in CD19 CAR-T cell trials and how some of these challenges may be overcome will help guide the development of CAR-T cell therapy for malignancies of B-cell origin, as well as for other hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cancers.

Keywords

Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Overall Response Rate Chimeric Antigen Receptor Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Patient Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding

KAH is supported by the University of British Columbia, Clinical Investigator Program Fellowship.

Conflict of interest

KAH declares no conflict of interest. CJT receives research funding from Juno Therapeutics and has received payment for participation on advisory boards and for speaking at educational events. CJT has patents pending related to CAR-T cells.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of MedicineUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  2. 2.Clinical Research DivisionFred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA
  3. 3.Department of MedicineUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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