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Rivaroxaban With or Without Aspirin for the Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease: Clinical Implications of the COMPASS Trial

  • Stephen J. NichollsEmail author
  • Adam J. Nelson
Review Article
  • 137 Downloads

Abstract

The COMPASS trial compared the impact of the selective direct factor Xa inhibitor, rivaroxaban, as monotherapy or in combination with aspirin on major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with stable atherosclerotic disease. Patients treated with rivaroxaban 2.5 mg twice daily in combination with aspirin experienced fewer cardiovascular events but more bleeding complications than those who received aspirin monotherapy. In contrast, a higher dose of rivaroxaban (5 mg twice daily) and aspirin produced no clinical benefit and continued to be associated with greater bleeding rates than aspirin. Examining this study in the context of other trials of anticoagulant therapy in atherosclerotic vascular disease, this review attempts to place the role of very low-dose rivaroxaban in clinical context and highlights areas for future research.

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding

No sources of funding were used to conduct this study or prepare this manuscript.

Conflict of interest

SJN has received research support from AstraZeneca, Amgen, Anthera, CSL Behring, Cerenis, Eli Lilly, Esperion, Resverlogix, Novartis, InfraReDx, and Sanofi-Regeneron and is a consultant for Amgen, AstraZeneca, Boehringer Ingelheim, CSL Behring, Eli Lilly, Esperion, Kowa, Merck, Takeda, Pfizer, Sanofi-Regeneron, and Novo Nordisk. AJN has no conflicts of interest that are directly relevant to the content of this article.

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.South Australian Health and Medical Research InstituteAdelaideAustralia
  2. 2.Monash Cardiovascular Research CentreMonash UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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