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American Journal of Cardiovascular Drugs

, Volume 17, Issue 5, pp 375–389 | Cite as

Recommendations for Managing Drug–Drug Interactions with Statins and HIV Medications

  • Barbara S. WigginsEmail author
  • Donald G. LamprechtJr.
  • Robert L. PageII
  • Joseph J. Saseen
Review Article

Abstract

The discovery of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has enabled individuals to live longer. As a result, HIV is now often considered a chronic condition. However, as a result of the increase in longevity or the HIV treatment modalities themselves, individuals with HIV are at high risk for the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Therefore, these patients should be optimized with pharmacologic therapy to lower their cardiovascular risk through the addition of statin therapy to their regimen. Unfortunately, many medications utilized to treat HIV interact with this class of agents, making prescribing of statin therapy in these patients challenging. While several classes of ARTs do not pose an increased risk of drug–drug interactions with statins, HIV treatment often requires several combinations of medications, enhancing the complexity and drug–drug interaction risk. Clinicians should be aware of interactions with statins and ART and carefully review the degree and clinical significance of each particular medication. With this understanding, the appropriate statin as well as statin dose can be selected in order to optimize the treatment of this patient population, while minimizing the potential risk of adverse effects.

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Statin Simvastatin Atorvastatin Pravastatin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding

No external funding was used in the preparation of this manuscript.

Conflict of interest

BS Wiggins has no conflicts of interest that might be relevant to the contents of this manuscript. DG Lamprecht has no conflicts of interest that might be relevant to the contents of this manuscript. RL Page has no conflicts of interest that might be relevant to the contents of this manuscript. JJ Saseen has no conflicts of interest that might be relevant to the contents of this manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara S. Wiggins
    • 1
    • 4
    Email author
  • Donald G. LamprechtJr.
    • 2
    • 3
  • Robert L. PageII
    • 3
  • Joseph J. Saseen
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacy ServicesMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA
  2. 2.Kaiser Permanente of ColoradoDenverUSA
  3. 3.University of Colorado Anschutz Medical CampusAuroraUSA
  4. 4.South Carolina College of PharmacyCharlestonUSA

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