Advertisement

Expanding the horizons: connecting gender and fisheries to the political economy

  • Meryl Williams
Viewpoint
  • 4 Downloads

Abstract

Since 1990, papers presented at successive women/gender and fisheries conferences of the Asian Fisheries Society have followed a pathway trodden by other fields of gender research. Starting with noticing androcentrism in fisheries, the conferences proceeded to noticing the omissions and adding depth of detail on women’s roles and their contributions. Adding gender perspectives then helped to identify politicized policy and power structures and recognize the importance of accounting for intersectionality, as well as propose transformation. Historically, this work is rooted in the broader scholarship on gender and fisheries, in which the positions of women are dictated by the prevailing political economy of fisheries, itself embedded in the global political economy. Despite the greater insights, the position of women has changed little. The time is therefore ripe for gender and fisheries researchers to broaden their horizons and develop a feminist fisheries political economy agenda to better support activism for gender equal fisheries. A foundation for such work has already been laid in fisheries from the gender studies and activism of fisheries restructuring under globalization. The global feminist political economy project also has paved the way. The global project can be adapted to guide three major fisheries research areas. The first is understanding the gendered structures in fisheries economies as embedded in the gendered global economy. The second key is specifically assessing fisheries economic policies and practices using the lens of women’s rights in the fish value chain, from production inputs to rights of access to fish and fishing, and to women’s position in post-harvest processing and marketing. The third is examining the unpaid and household economy in which a great deal of women’s fisheries and reproductive work in the household and community is done. As the new research agenda and its link to activism may not be embraced by some mainstream agencies already studying gender and fisheries, do we need to create feminist fisheries political economy think tanks with greater flexibility?

Keywords

Gender Political economy Fisheries Feminist Research agenda Globalization 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The author states that there is no conflict of interest.

References

  1. Barrientos, S., G. Gereffi, and A. Rossi. 2011. Economic and social upgrading in global production networks: a new paradigm for a changing world. International Labour Review 150 (3–4): 319–340.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Biswas, N. 2011. Turning the tide: women’s lives in fisheries and the assault of capital. Economic and Political Weekly, 53–60.Google Scholar
  3. Campling, L., E. Havice, and P. McCall Howard. 2012. The political economy and ecology of capture fisheries: market dynamics, resource access and relations of exploitation and resistance. Journal of Agrarian Change 12 (April and July): 177–203.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Chapman, M.D. 1987. Women’s fishing in Oceania. Human Ecology 15 (3): 267–288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Choo, P.S., S.J. Hall and M.J. Williams (eds.). 2006. Global symposium on gender and fisheries. Seventh Asian Fisheries Forum, 1–2 December 2004. WorldFish Center and Asian Fisheries Society, Penang. 174 pp.Google Scholar
  6. Choo, P.S., B.S. Nowak, K. Kusakabe, and M.J. Williams. 2008. Guest editorial: gender and fisheries. Development 51 (2): 176–179.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Firth, Raymond. 1966a. Malay fishermen: their peasant economy. New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  8. Firth, Rosemary. 1966b. Housekeeping among Malay peasants. London School of Economics Monographs on Social Anthropology No.7. New York: The Athlone Press.Google Scholar
  9. Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (UNFAO). 2012. Evaluation of FAO’s support to the implementation of the code of conduct for responsible fisheries. Rome: FAO evaluation office.Google Scholar
  10. Frangoudes, K., and E. Keromnes. 2008. Women in artisanal fisheries in Brittany, France. Development 51 (2): 265–270.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Gadagkar, SR (ed). 1992. Women in Indian fisheries. Proceedings of the Workshop on Women in Indian Fisheries. 27 May 1990. Special Publication 8, 51 pp. Asian Fisheries Society, Indian Branch, Mangalore, India.Google Scholar
  12. Gerrard, S. 1987. Women in the fishing districts: the “ground crew” of the fishing industry? In Women in the Norwegian fisheries: a collection of articles, ed. D. Gronbeck and S. Gerrard, 28. Alta: Finnmark College.Google Scholar
  13. Gopal, N., L. Edwin, and B. Meenakumari. 2014a. Transformation in gender roles with changes in traditional fisheries in Kerala, India. Asian Fisheries Science 27S: 67–78.Google Scholar
  14. Gopal, N., M.J. Williams, M. Porter, K. Kusakabe, and P.S. Choo. 2014b. Gender in aquaculture and fisheries: navigating change. Asian Fisheries Science 27S: 268.Google Scholar
  15. Gopal, N., M.J. Williams, M. Porter, and K. Kusakabe. 2016. Gender in aquaculture and fisheries: the long-journey to equality. Asian Fisheries Science 29S: 246.Google Scholar
  16. Gopal, N., M.J. Williams, S. Gerrard, S. Siar, K. Kusakabe, L. Lebel, H. Hapke, M. Porter, A. Coles, N. Stacey and R. Bhujel 2017. Gender in aquaculture and fisheries: engendering security in fisheries and aquaculture. Asian Fisheries Science (Special Issue) 30S. 423 pp.Google Scholar
  17. Groenewegen, P. 2008. Political economy. In S.N. Durlauf and L.E. Blume (eds). The new Palgrave dictionary of economics, 2nd edition. Article accessed online 18 August 2019 at https://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1057/978-1-349-95121-5_1365-2
  18. Hillenbrand E, Karim N, Mohanraj P and Wu D. 2015. Measuring gender transformative change: a review of literature and promising practices. CARE USA. Working Paper.Google Scholar
  19. ICSF (International Collective in Support of Fishworkers). 1995. Public hearing on the struggles of women workers in the fish processing industry in India. 23 and 24 June 1995, Cochin, Kerala, India. 50 pp.Google Scholar
  20. International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (ICSF) 2016. ICSF’S journey with women in fisheries. ICSF, Chennai.Google Scholar
  21. Jentoft, S. 2014. Walking the talk: Implementing the international voluntary guidelines for securing sustainable small-scale fisheries. Maritime Studies 13 (1): 16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Kumari, B. 2016. Decreasing trend in participation of women in fish marketing in Patna, Bihar (India). Asian Fisheries Science 29S: 205–212.Google Scholar
  23. Kusakabe, K., Sereyvath, P., Suntornratana, U. and Sriputinibondh, N. 2006. Women in fish border trade: the case of fish trade between Cambodia and Thailand. In Global symposium on gender and fisheries (Seventh Asian Fisheries Forum, 1–2 December 2004), PS Choo, SJ Hall and MJ Williams (eds.) pp. 91–102.Google Scholar
  24. MacDonald, M. 2005. Lessons and linkages: building a framework for analyzing the relationships between gender, globalization and the fisheries. In Changing tides: gender, fisheries and globalization, ed. B. Neis, M. Binkley, S. Gerrard, and M.C. Maneschy, 18–27. Halifax: Fernwood Publishing.Google Scholar
  25. Nadel-Klein, J., and D.L. Davis (eds.) 1988. To work and to weep: women in fishing economies. Social and economic paper 18. St. John’s, New Foundland: Institute of Social and Economic Research, St. Johns Memorial University of New Foundland.Google Scholar
  26. Nandeesha, M.C. and Hanglomong, H. (eds). 1997. Women in fisheries in Indo-China countries , Proceedings of the Seminar on Women in Fisheries in Indo-China Countries, Bati Fisheries Station, PADEK, Cambodia. 167 pp.Google Scholar
  27. Nandeesha, M.C. and Heng, N. (Compilers). 1994. Women in Cambodian fisheries, Proceedings of the National Workshop on women in fisheries, Bati Fisheries Station, PADEK, Cambodia.Google Scholar
  28. Nayak, N. and C. Quist. 2018. Evolving a feminist perspective in fisheries and the history of the Women in Fisheries Programme (1993-2014) of The International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (ICSF). 7th Global Conference on Gender in Aquaculture and Fisheries, 18-21 October 2018, Bangkok Thailand. http://www.genderaquafish.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Special-workshop-IV_Nalini-Cornelie.pdf
  29. Neis, B. 2000. In the eye of the storm: research, activism and teaching within the Newfoundland fishery crisis. Women's Studies International Forum 23: 287–298.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Neis, B., M. Binkley, S. Gerrard, and M.C. Maneschy, eds. 2005. Changing tides: gender, fisheries and globalization. Halifax: Fernwood Publishing.Google Scholar
  31. Nishchith, V.D. 2001. Role and status of women employed in seafood processing units in India. In: Williams, M.J., M.C. Nandeesha, V.P. Corral, E. Tech and P.S. Choo (eds.) International symposium on women in Asian fisheries: Fifth Asian Fisheries Forum. Asian Fisheries Society, 13 November 1998, Chiang Mai, Thailand. WorldFish Centre and Asian Fisheries Society, Penang, pp 127–136.Google Scholar
  32. Nuruzzaman, M., S.U.M. Selim, and M.H. Miah. 2014. Rights, benefits and social justice: status of women workers engaged in the shrimp processing industries of Bangladesh. Asian Fisheries Science 27S: 151–163.Google Scholar
  33. Pearson, R., 1998. ‘Nimble fingers’ revisited: reflections on women and Third World industrialisation in the late twentieth century. In: C. Jackson and R. Pearson. Feminist Visions of Development: Gender Analysis and Policy. Routledge, London. pp 172–189.Google Scholar
  34. Peterson, V. S. 2004. A critical rewriting of global political economy: integrating reproductive, productive and virtual economies. Routledge.Google Scholar
  35. Rai, S. and G. Waylen (eds) 2013. New frontiers in feminist political economy. Routledge.Google Scholar
  36. Resurrección, B.P. 2013. Persistent women and environment linkages in climate change and sustainable development agendas. Women's Studies International Forum 40: 33–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Singh Kohli, MP and R. Tewari (eds) 2002. Women in fisheries. Indian Society of Fisheries Professionals, Mumbai, India. 155 pp.Google Scholar
  38. Tavares de Azevedo, N., and N. Pierri. 2013. Gains and challenges. Yemaya 43: 5–7.Google Scholar
  39. Williams, M.J. (2008) Why Look at Fisheries through a Gender Lens? Development 51:180–185CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Williams, M.J. 2014a. Twenty-five issues of the women in fisheries information bulletin: the story within the story of 25 years of women in fisheries at SPC. Women in Fisheries Information Bulletin 25: 5–10.Google Scholar
  41. Williams, M.J. 2014b. Essay: Dr M.C. Nandeesha -the man who brought gender awareness to the Asian Fisheries Society. Asian Fisheries Science 27S: 225–232.Google Scholar
  42. Williams, M.J., M.C. Nandeesha, V.P. Corral, E. Tech and P.S. Choo (eds.) 2001. International symposium on women in Asian fisheries: Fifth Asian Fisheries Forum. Asian Fisheries Society, 13 November 1998, Chiang Mai, Thailand. WorldFish Centre and Asian Fisheries Society, Penang. 181 pp.Google Scholar
  43. Williams, M.J, N.H. Chao, P.S. Choo, K. Matics, M.C.N. Nandeesha, M. Shariff, E. Tech, and J.M.C. Wong (eds.) 2002a. Global symposium on women in fisheries: Sixth Asian Fisheries Forum. 29 November 2001, Kaohsiung, Taiwan. WorldFish Centre and Asian Fisheries Society, Penang. 201 pp.Google Scholar
  44. Williams, M.J., S.B. Williams, and P.S. Choo. 2002b. From women in fisheries to gender and fisheries. In Global symposium on women in fisheries: Sixth Asian Fisheries Forum. 29 November 2001, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, ed. M.J. Williams, N.H. Chao, P.S. Choo, K. Matics, M.C.N. Nandeesha, M. Shariff, E. Tech, and J.M.C. Wong, 13–18. Penang: WorldFish Centre and Asian Fisheries Society.Google Scholar
  45. Williams, M.J., M.C. Nandeesha, and P.S. Choo. 2006. Changing traditions: a summary report on the first global look at the gender dimensions of fisheries. In Global symposium on gender and fisheries. Seventh Asian Fisheries Forum, 1–2 December 2004, ed. P.S. Choo, S.J. Hall, and M.J. Williams, 1–6. Penang: WorldFish Center and Asian Fisheries Society.Google Scholar
  46. Williams, M.J., M. Porter, P.S. Choo, K. Kusakabe, V. Vuki, N. Gopal, and M. Bondad-Reantaso. 2012. Gender in aquaculture and fisheries: moving the agenda forward. Asian Fisheries Science 25S: 276.Google Scholar
  47. Williams, M., C. Pedroza, A. Sharma, M. Axelrod, D. Squires, S. Williams, A. Solanke, K. Fakoya, H. Hapke, K. Barclay, A. De Silva, S. Harper, C. Pasani, M. Szymkowiak and R. Sumaila (2018) Why gender matters in fisheries economics and trade. http://www.genderaquafish.org/iifet-2018-seattle/

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.AspleyAustralia

Personalised recommendations