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Infection

, Volume 47, Issue 6, pp 1059–1063 | Cite as

Non-typhoidal Salmonella aortitis

  • Giulia GardiniEmail author
  • Paola Zanotti
  • Alessandro Pucci
  • Lina Tomasoni
  • Silvio Caligaris
  • Barbara Paro
  • Emanuele Gavazzi
  • Domenico Albano
  • Stefano Bonardelli
  • Roberto Maroldi
  • Raffaele Giubbini
  • Francesco Castelli
Case Report
  • 171 Downloads

Abstract

Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) spp. causes about 40% of all infective aortitis and it is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. Human infection occurs by fecal–oral transmission through ingestion of contaminated food, milk, or water (inter-human or zoonotic transmission). Approximately 5% of patients with NTS gastroenteritis develop bacteremia and the incidence of extra-intestinal focal infection in NTS bacteremia is about 40%. The organism can reach an extra-intestinal focus through blood dissemination, direct extension from the surrounding organs and direct bacterial inoculation (e.g. invasive medical procedures). Medical and surgical interventions are both needed to successfully control the infection. Here, we report a case of abdominal sub-renal aortitis caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis in an 80-year-old man.

Keywords

Salmonella Aortitis Extra-intestinal localization by Salmonella 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank the participants who contributed to this report.

Funding

No funding was received.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

Informed consent

A consent for the use of the clinical data was provided.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giulia Gardini
    • 1
    Email author
  • Paola Zanotti
    • 1
  • Alessandro Pucci
    • 2
  • Lina Tomasoni
    • 1
  • Silvio Caligaris
    • 1
  • Barbara Paro
    • 2
  • Emanuele Gavazzi
    • 3
  • Domenico Albano
    • 4
  • Stefano Bonardelli
    • 2
  • Roberto Maroldi
    • 3
  • Raffaele Giubbini
    • 4
  • Francesco Castelli
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Infectious and Tropical DiseasesASST Spedali Civili and University of BresciaBresciaItaly
  2. 2.Department of Vascular SurgeryASST Spedali Civili and University of BresciaBresciaItaly
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyASST Spedali CiviliBresciaItaly
  4. 4.Department of Nuclear MedicineASST Spedali CiviliBresciaItaly

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