Advertisement

Infection

, Volume 43, Issue 5, pp 569–575 | Cite as

Obesity not associated with severity among hospitalized adults with seasonal influenza virus infection

  • Elise S. Braun
  • Forrest W. Crawford
  • Mayur M. Desai
  • James Meek
  • Pam Daily Kirley
  • Lisa Miller
  • Evan J. Anderson
  • Oluwakemi Oni
  • Patricia Ryan
  • Ruth Lynfield
  • Marisa Bargsten
  • Nancy M. Bennett
  • Krista L. Lung
  • Ann Thomas
  • Elizabeth Mermel
  • Mary Lou Lindegren
  • William Schaffner
  • Andrea Price
  • Sandra S. ChavesEmail author
Brief Report

Abstract

We examined seasonal influenza severity [artificial ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and radiographic-confirmed pneumonia] by weight category among adults hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza. Using multivariate logistic regression models, we found no association between obesity or severe obesity and artificial ventilation or ICU admission; however, overweight and obese patients had decreased risk of pneumonia. Underweight was associated with pneumonia (adjusted odds ratio 1.31; 95 % confidence interval 1.04, 1.64).

Keywords

Influenza Severe influenza Influenza hospitalizations Obesity BMI Body mass index 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Kyle Openo MPH, and Monica M. Farley MD at the Georgia Emerging Infections Program; Joelle Nadle, MPH and Mirasol Apostol, MPH at the California Emerging Infections Program; Deborah Aragon, FluSurv-NET Coordinator at the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment; Juliana Darrow, Veronica Fialkowski, Katelyn Hall, and Maryam Nuriyeva, Medical Record Abstractors, at the University of Colorado; Kimberly Yousey-Hindes, MPH, CPH at the Connecticut Emerging Infections Program; Maya Monroe, MPH at the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene; Matthew Laidler, MA, MPH, at the Oregon Public Health Division; Diane Brady, Consultant Public Health Nurse, Jessica Signore, Disease Intervention Specialist, and Daniela Quilliam, Chief of Acute Infectious Diseases; Karen Leib and Katie Dyer at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN; Kathy Angeles, Lisa Butler, Sarah Khanlian, and Robert Mansmann, Surveillance Officers at the New Mexico Emerging Infections Program; Craig Morin at the Minnesota Department of Health The Influenza Hospitalization Surveillance Network (FluSurv-NET) is a collaboration of state health departments, academic institutions and local partners, and is funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This publication was supported in part by Cooperative Agreement number CDC-RFA-CK12-1202 and 5U38HM000414 from CDC. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, US Department of Health and Human Services.

Conflict of interest

No potential conflict of interest.

References

  1. 1.
    Morgan OW, et al. Morbid obesity as a risk factor for hospitalization and death due to 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) disease. PLoS ONE. 2010;5:e9694.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Diaz E, et al. Impact of obesity in patients infected with 2009 influenza A(H1N1). Chest. 2011;139:382–6.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Louie JK, et al. A novel risk factor for a novel virus: obesity and 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1). Clin Infect Dis. 2011;52:301–12.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Kwong JC, Campitelli MA, Rosella LC. Obesity and respiratory hospitalizations during influenza seasons in Ontario, Canada: a cohort study. Clin Infect Dis. 2011;53:413–21.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Cocoros NM, et al. Obesity as a risk factor for severe influenza-like illness. Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2014;8:25–32.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Coleman LA, et al. Evaluation of obesity as an independent risk factor for medically attended laboratory-confirmed influenza. Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2013;7:160–7.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Singanayagam A, Singanayagam A, Chalmers JD. Obesity is associated with improved survival in community-acquired pneumonia. Eur Respir J. 2013;42:180–7.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Blumentals WA, et al. Body mass index and the incidence of influenza-associated pneumonia in a UK primary care cohort. Influenza Other Respir Viruses. 2012;6:28–36.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Uppot RN, et al. Impact of obesity on medical imaging and image-guided intervention. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2007;188:433–40.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Ritz BW, Gardner EM. Malnutrition and energy restriction differentially affect viral immunity. J Nutr. 2006;136:1141–4.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg (outside the USA)  2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elise S. Braun
    • 1
    • 2
  • Forrest W. Crawford
    • 1
  • Mayur M. Desai
    • 1
  • James Meek
    • 3
  • Pam Daily Kirley
    • 4
  • Lisa Miller
    • 5
  • Evan J. Anderson
    • 6
  • Oluwakemi Oni
    • 7
  • Patricia Ryan
    • 8
  • Ruth Lynfield
    • 9
  • Marisa Bargsten
    • 10
  • Nancy M. Bennett
    • 11
  • Krista L. Lung
    • 12
  • Ann Thomas
    • 13
  • Elizabeth Mermel
    • 14
  • Mary Lou Lindegren
    • 15
  • William Schaffner
    • 15
  • Andrea Price
    • 16
  • Sandra S. Chaves
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Yale School of Public HealthNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.Influenza DivisionCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA
  3. 3.Connecticut Emerging Infections ProgramYale School of Public HealthNew HavenUSA
  4. 4.California Emerging Infections ProgramOaklandUSA
  5. 5.Colorado Department of Public Health and EnvironmentDenverUSA
  6. 6.Georgia Emerging Infections ProgramAtlantaUSA
  7. 7.Iowa Department of Public HealthDes MoinesUSA
  8. 8.Maryland Department of Health and Mental HygieneBaltimoreUSA
  9. 9.Minnesota Department of HealthSt. PaulUSA
  10. 10.New Mexico Department of HealthSanta FeUSA
  11. 11.Department of MedicineUniversity of Rochester School of Medicine and DentistryRochesterUSA
  12. 12.Ohio Department of HealthColumbusUSA
  13. 13.Oregon Public Health DivisionPortlandUSA
  14. 14.Rhode Island Department of HealthProvidenceUSA
  15. 15.Vanderbilt University School of MedicineNashvilleUSA
  16. 16.Salt Lake County Health DepartmentSalt Lake CityUSA

Personalised recommendations