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Infection

, Volume 42, Issue 2, pp 445–447 | Cite as

Successful treatment of AIDS-associated, primary CNS lymphoma with rituximab- and methotrexate-based chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation

  • T. Wolf
  • T. Kiderlen
  • J. Atta
  • C. Stephan
  • G. Kann
  • H.-R. Brodt
  • C. Brandts
Case Report

Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is an Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-associated, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining malignancy. Even in the HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy) era, in which the survival of patients with PCNSL has improved and the incidence has sharply reduced [1, 2], the median survival time is <6 months [1]. PCNSL has become a rare disease and, consequently, there is no consensus and only anecdotal evidence on the best treatment. Options include high-dose methotrexate (MTX) and radiotherapy.

In the non-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) setting, sequential high-dose MTX/cytarabin regimens followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) have been shown to improve 5-year overall survival from 69 to 87 % [3]. The addition of radiation therapy to such regimens, however, was found to be associated with increased neurotoxicity [4]. There is currently no data on the feasibility and efficacy of such protocols in the clinical setting...

Keywords

Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma BCNU Liposomal Doxorubicin Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Conflict of interest

There was no financial or material support provided for this work. TW had board memberships, received consultancy fees, payment for lectures and travel grants from Abbvie, BMS, Gilead, MSD, Oxford Immunotec and ViiV. HRB had board memberships, received consultancy fees, payment for lectures and travel grants from Gilead, Janssen, MSD, Pfizer and ViiV. CS received consultancy fees from Abbvie, BMS, Boehringer, Gilead, Janssen, MSD, ViiV. JA, GK and CB have no disclosures.

References

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    Hoffmann C, Tabrizian S, Wolf E, Eggers C, Stoehr A, Plettenberg A, Buhk T, Stellbrink HJ, Horst HA, Jäger H, Rosenkranz T. Survival of AIDS patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma is dramatically improved by HAART-induced immune recovery. AIDS. 2001;15:2119–27.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Wolf
    • 1
  • T. Kiderlen
    • 2
  • J. Atta
    • 2
  • C. Stephan
    • 1
  • G. Kann
    • 1
  • H.-R. Brodt
    • 1
  • C. Brandts
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Medicine II—Infectious Diseases, HIV CenterHospital of the J. W. Goethe UniversityFrankfurtGermany
  2. 2.Department of Medicine II—Hematology/OncologyHospital of the J. W. Goethe UniversityFrankfurtGermany

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