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Infection

, Volume 40, Issue 2, pp 225–228 | Cite as

Implementing strategic bundles for infection prevention and management

  • K. Kaier
  • C. Wilson
  • M. Hulscher
  • H. Wollersheim
  • A. Huis
  • M. Borg
  • E. Scicluna
  • M.-L. Lambert
  • M. Palomar
  • E. Tacconelli
  • G. De Angelis
  • M. Schumacher
  • M. Wolkewitz
  • E.-M. Kleissle
  • U. FrankEmail author
Commentary

Abstract

Healthcare-associated infections (HAI) are considered to be the most frequent adverse event in healthcare delivery. Active efforts to curb HAI have increased across Europe thanks to the growing emphasis on patient safety and quality of care. Recently, there has been dramatic success in improving the quality of patient care by focusing on the implementation of a group or “bundle” of evidenced-based preventive practices to achieve a better outcome than when implemented individually. The project entitled IMPLEMENT is designed to spread and test knowledge on how to implement strategic bundles for infection prevention and management in a diverse sample of European hospitals. The general goal of this project is to provide evidence on how to decrease the incidence of HAI and to improve antibiotic use under routine conditions.

Keywords

Healthcare-associated infections Antibiotic resistance Bundle Implementation Europe 

Notes

Conflict of interest

None.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Kaier
    • 1
  • C. Wilson
    • 1
  • M. Hulscher
    • 2
  • H. Wollersheim
    • 2
  • A. Huis
    • 2
  • M. Borg
    • 3
  • E. Scicluna
    • 3
  • M.-L. Lambert
    • 4
  • M. Palomar
    • 5
  • E. Tacconelli
    • 6
  • G. De Angelis
    • 6
  • M. Schumacher
    • 7
  • M. Wolkewitz
    • 7
  • E.-M. Kleissle
    • 8
  • U. Frank
    • 8
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Environmental Health SciencesUniversity Medical Center FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  2. 2.IQ HealthcareRadboud University Nijmegen Medical CentreNijmegenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Infection Control UnitMater Dei HospitalMsidaMalta
  4. 4.Scientific Institute of Public HealthBrusselsBelgium
  5. 5.Hospital Vall D’HebrónBarcelonaSpain
  6. 6.Department of Infectious DiseasesUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRomeItaly
  7. 7.Institute of Medical Biometry and Medical StatisticsUniversity Medical Center FreiburgFreiburgGermany
  8. 8.Department of Infectious Diseases, Division of Infection Control and Hospital EpidemiologyHeidelberg University HospitalHeidelbergGermany

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