Infection

, Volume 37, Issue 2, pp 142–147

Outcome and Predictive Factors of Mortality in Hospitalized HIV-Patients in Burkina Faso

  • N. Saleri
  • S. Capone
  • V. Pietra
  • G. De Iaco
  • V. Del Punta
  • M. Rizzi
  • M. Levi
  • S. Rouamba
  • E. Somé
  • J. Simporé
  • A. Patroni
  • G. Carosi
  • F. Castelli
Brief Report

Abstract

Background:

The aim of this study was to describe the clinical presentation and predictors of death in a HIV population hospitalized in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

Materials and Methods:

Baseline demographics, viro-immunological status, clinical presentations, and outcome have been analyzed by univariate analysis and a multivariate model.

Results:

A total of 1,071 hospitalizations of HIV-positive patients was recorded between 1 January, 2004 and 31 August, 2006, the majority of whom were female (64.1%). The baseline CD4 cell count/μl was higher in the female patients than in the male ones (166.1 vs 110.9). Gastroenteric symptoms were the first cause of hospitalization (61.7%). The crude mortality rate was higher in males than females (38% vs 25.3%). Baseline World Health Organization clinical stage IV (OR 9.22), neurological syndrome (OR 3.04) or wasting syndrome at admission (OR 2.9), positive malaria film (OR 2.17), and an older age independently predicted death. Weight at admission > 40 kg and a higher platelet count at admission were independently associated with a better outcome.

Conclusions:

Females are admitted to hospital earlier than males, probably as an indirect result of the Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission (PMTCT) public health initiative. An active search of HIV status in other members of the family (PMTCT-plus) may result in the detection of asymptomatic HIV-infected patients as well. A Plasmodium falciparum-positive smear during admission significantly impacted on outcome as well as low platelet count.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Saleri
    • 1
    • 3
  • S. Capone
    • 1
    • 3
  • V. Pietra
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. De Iaco
    • 1
    • 3
  • V. Del Punta
    • 1
    • 3
  • M. Rizzi
    • 1
  • M. Levi
    • 3
  • S. Rouamba
    • 2
  • E. Somé
    • 2
  • J. Simporé
    • 2
    • 4
  • A. Patroni
    • 1
  • G. Carosi
    • 1
  • F. Castelli
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute for Infectious and Tropical DiseasesUniversity of BresciaBresciaItaly
  2. 2.Centre d’Accueil Notre Dame de Fatima (CANDAF), Vice-Province CamillienneOuagadougouBurkina Faso
  3. 3.Medicus Mundi ItalyBresciaItaly
  4. 4.Pietro Annigoni Centre for Bio-Molecular Research (CERBA)OuagadougouBurkina Faso

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