Infection

, Volume 34, Issue 5, pp 258–263 | Cite as

Influence of Prolonged Use of Intravenous Administration Sets in Paediatric Cancer Patients on CVAD-related Bloodstream Infection Rates and Hospital Resources

  • A. Simon
  • G. Fleischhack
  • G. Wiszniewsky
  • C. Hasan
  • U. Bode
  • M. H. Kramer
Clinical and Epidemiological Study

Abstract

Background:

To assess the effects of extending the routine intravenous administration set (IVAS) change-interval from 72 h (group 1) to 7 days (group 2) on the incidence density for central venous access device (CVAD)-related bloodstream infections (BSIs) and on resource expenditures in a singlecentre pilot study.

Procedure:

Prospective pre-/post-intervention comparison of two consecutive 12-month surveillance periods (2001–2003) in a 17-bed paediatric oncology tertiary care unit. IVAS changes and nosocomial infections (NIs) were prospectively analysed using a standardized unit-based surveillance system (Oncopaed NI).

Results:

All 175 eligible patients were enrolled, 96 in group 1 and 79 in group 2. Both groups had similar distributions of primary diagnoses and risk factors. The proportion of IVAS changes performed after 3 days increased from 5.6% to 22.5%, but only 8% of IVASs in group 2 were changed after 7 days. Most IVAS changes (64.8% in group 1 and 92.9% in group 2) were done because of therapeutic interventions (blood products, parenteral nutrition [TNP]) before the scheduled endpoint. Overall, the rates and incidence densities of NIs were significantly lower during the second period. The corresponding results for CVAD-related BSIs did not show significant differences. No death attributable to a NI occurred. The ‘7-day’ strategy resulted in cost savings for devices (3,300$/year) and of nursing time (23 working days/year).

Conclusions:

Extending the routine IVAS change-interval from 3 days to 7 days appears to be safe and cost-effective in a paediatric oncology unit with high infection control standards and continuous surveillance for NIs. These results do not prove that 7-day intervals prevent infections, but they do suggest that this policy probably is not harmful and that a prospectively randomized study with sufficient power is needed.

Keywords

Paediatric Oncology Incidence Density Nursing Time Paediatric Cancer Patient National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance 

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Copyright information

© Urban & Vogel München 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Simon
    • 1
  • G. Fleischhack
    • 1
  • G. Wiszniewsky
    • 1
  • C. Hasan
    • 1
  • U. Bode
    • 1
  • M. H. Kramer
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of Paediatric Hematology and OncologyChildren’s Hospital, Medical Center, University of BonnBonnGermany
  2. 2.Institute for Hygiene and Public HealthUniversity of BonnBonnGermany

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