Advertisement

Infection

, Volume 31, Issue 2, pp 81–85 | Cite as

Prevalence of Tropheryma whipplei DNA in Patients with Various Gastrointestinal Diseases and in Healthy Controls

  • L. Amsler
  • P. Bauernfeind
  • C. Nigg
  • R.C. Maibach
  • R. Steffen
  • M. Altwegg
Clinical and Epidemiological Study

Abstract.

Background: Little is known about the epidemiology of Tropheryma whipplei and its prevalence in people without clinical signs of Whipple's disease.

Patients and Methods: We screened 239 patients with various gastrointestinal diseases for T. whipplei DNA and compared them with 215 healthy controls in order to check whether T. whipplei might be a risk factor for common gastrointestinal problems or diseases. We detected the 16S rDNA of T. whipplei in salivary and stool samples using a specific seminested PCR.

Results: The prevalence of T. whipplei DNA in patients and in controls was 4.2% (95% CI 2.0–7.6% ) and 7.0% (95% CI 4.0–11.3%), respectively. None of the different gastrointestinal diseases was associated with a higher rate of PCR-positive tests, except for the group of patients with reflux syndrome. Five out of 43 patients with reflux were found to be positive, with all five being positive in the salivary sample. This is in contrast to our findings in carriers without reflux with mainly positive stool samples (p < 0.01).

Conclusion: We conclude that the asymptomatic carrier state of T. whipplei indeed exists and that it is much more frequent than the rare Whipple's disease. The higher prevalence of T. whipplei DNA in the saliva of patients with reflux syndrome suggests that the stomach might be the habitat of the organism.

Keywords

Clinical Sign Stool Sample Gastrointestinal Disease Carrier State Asymptomatic Carrier 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Urban & Vogel Medien und Medizin Verlagsgesellschaft 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Amsler
    • 1
  • P. Bauernfeind
    • 2
  • C. Nigg
    • 3
  • R.C. Maibach
    • 5
  • R. Steffen
    • 4
  • M. Altwegg
    • 5
  1. 1.Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, CH-3003 Bern, SwitzerlandCH
  2. 2.Division of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of Zurich, CH-8091 Zurich, SwitzerlandCH
  3. 3.Medical Policlinic, University Hospital of Zurich, CH-8091 Zurich, SwitzerlandCH
  4. 4.Institute for Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Zurich, CH-8091, SwitzerlandCH
  5. 5.Dept. of Medical Microbiology, University of Zurich, Gloriastr. 30, CH-8028 Zurich, Switzerland. altwegg@immv.unizhCH

Personalised recommendations