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MMW - Fortschritte der Medizin

, Volume 158, Supplement 2, pp 43–46 | Cite as

Beziehung als Risiko

HIV-negative Partner sollen das auch bleiben!

  • Heiko Jessen
FORTBILDUNG . ÜBERSICHT

Paare werden als „serodiskordant“ bezeichnet, wenn nur einer von ihnen mit HIV infiziert ist. Normalerweise bleibt es nicht dabei, und dies ist einer der wichtigsten Faktoren der globalen HIV-Epidemie. Dabei lässt sich die Infektion über den Partner heutzutage gut verhindern.

HIV & relationship — what if only one of the partners is HIV positive?

Keywords

HIV serodiscordant couple pre-exposure prophylaxis treatment as prevention 

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Copyright information

© Springer Medizin 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Praxis Jessen2 + KollegenBerlinDeutschland

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