Advertisement

Changes in phenolic compounds (Isoflavones and Phenolic acids) and antioxidant properties in high-protein soybean (Glycine max L., cv. Saedanbaek) for different roasting conditions

  • Jin Hwan Lee
  • Byong Won Lee
  • Balo Kim
  • Hyun Tae Kim
  • Jong Min Ko
  • In-Yeoul Baek
  • Weon Taek Seo
  • Young Min Kang
  • Kye Man Cho
Original Article Food Science/Microbiology

Abstract

Contents of phenolic compound including isoflavones and phenolic acids as well as antioxidant effects in high-protein soybean cultivar “Saedanbaek” were evaluated under different roasting conditions. The roasted soybean exhibited significantly higher antioxidant activity than unroasted soybean in the three antioxidant methods including 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl, 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid), and Ferric reducing antioxidant power. In particular, the roasted soybean at 200°C for 15 min showed the highest antioxidant activity in comparison with other conditions. The contents of phenolic compounds, isoflavone aglycones (genistein, daidzein, and glycitein), isoflavone β-glucosides (genistin, daidzin, and glycitin), and phenolic acids increased, whereas isoflavone malonyl-β-glucosides decreased during roasting process. Moreover, total phenolic and flavonoid contents as well as those of isoflavone aglycones, isoflavone-β-glucosides, and phenolic acids increased, leading to a general increase in antioxidant activity after roasting. These results suggest that the roasting soybean extracts could contribute to obtaining natural antioxidants in certain food applications.

Keywords

antioxidant activity high-protein soybean isoflavone phenolic acid roasting 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Alam MN, Bristi NJ, and Rafiguzzaman M (2013) Review on in vivo and vitro methods evaluation of antioxidant activity. Saudi Pharm J 21, 143–152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bolis MS (1958) Anitoxidant determination by the use of a stable free radical. Nature 181, 1199–1200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Chandrasekara N and Shahidi F (2011) Antioxidative potential of cashew phenolics in food and biological model systems as affected by roasting. Food Chem 129, 1388–1396.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Cho KM, Hong SY, Math RK, Lee JH, Kambiranda DM, Kim JM et al. (2009) Biotransformation of phenolics (isoflavones, flavanols and phenolic acids) during the fermentation of cheonggukjang by Bacillus pumilus HY1. Food Chem 114, 413–419.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Cho KM, Lee JH, Yun HD, Ahn BY, Kim H, and Seo WT (2011) Changes of phytochemical constituents (isoflavones, flavanols, and phenolic acids) during cheonggukjang soybeans fermentation using potential probiotics Bacillus subtilis CS90. J. Food Comp Anal 24, 402–410.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Choi JS, Kim HY, Seo WT, Lee JH, and Cho KM (2012) Roasting enhances antioxidant effect of bitter melon (Momordica charantia L.) increasing in flavan-3-ol and phenolic acid contents. Food Sci Biotechnol 21, 19–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Chung IM, Seo SH, Ahn JK, and Kim SH (2011) Effect of processing, fermentation, and aging treatment to content and profile of phenolic compounds in soybean seed, soy curd and soy paste. Food Chem 127, 960–967.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Coward L, Smith M, Kirk M, and Barnes S (1998) Chemical modification of isoflavones in soyfoods during cooking and processing. American J Clin Nutr 68, 1486–1491.Google Scholar
  9. Dewanto V, Wu X, and Liu RH (2002) Processed sweet corn has higher antioxidant activity. J Agric Food Chem 50, 4959–4964.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Durmaz G and Gökmen V (2011) Changes in oxidative stability, antioxidant capacity and phytochemical composition of Pistacia terebinthus oil with roasting. Food Chem 128, 410–414.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Gallegos-Infante JA, Rocha-Guzman NE, Gonzalez-Laredo RF, and Pulido-Alonso J (2010) Effect of processing on the antioxidant properties of extracts Mexican barley (Hordeum vulgare) cultivar. Food Chem 119, 903–906.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Im MH, Choi JD, and Choi KS (1995) The oxidation stability and flavor acceptability of oil from roasted soybean. J. Agric Food Chem Biotechnol 38, 425–430.Google Scholar
  13. John JA and Shahidi F (2010) Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of Brazil nut (Bertholleta excels). J Funct Foods 2, 196–209.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Jung S, Murphy, PA, and Sala I (2008) Isoflavone profiles of soymilk as affected by high-pressure treatments of soymilk and soybeans. Food Chem 111, 592–598.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Kao TH and Chen BH (2006) Functional components in soybean cake and their effects on antioxidant activity. J. Agric Food Chem 54, 7544–7555.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Kim HG, Kim GW, Oh H, Yoo SY, Kim YO, and Oh MS (2011) Influence of roasting on the antioxidant activity of small black soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill). LWT-Food Sci Technol 44, 992–998.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Kwak CS, Lee MS, and Park SC (2007) Higher antioxidant properties of chungkookjang, a fermented soybean paste, may be due to increased aglycone and malonylglycoside isoflavone during fermentation. Nutr Res 27, 719–727.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Lee CH, Yang L, Xu JZ, Yeung SYV, Huang Y, and Chen ZY (2005) Relative antioxidant activity of soybean isoflavones and their glycosides. Food Chem 90, 735–741.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Lee JH, Baek IY, Ko JM, Kang NS, Shin SH, Lim SG et al. (2008) Antioxidant and tyrosinase inhibitory activities from seed coat of brown soybean. Food Sci Biotechnol 17, 1–7Google Scholar
  20. Lee JH and Cho KM (2012) Changes occurring in compositional components of black soybeans maintained at room temperature for different storage periods. Food Chem 131, 161–169.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Lee JH and Choung MG (2011) Determination of optimal acid hydrolysis time of soybean isoflavones using drying oven and microwave assisted methods. (2011) Food Chem 129, 577–582.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Lee JH, Seo WT, Lim WJ, and Cho KM (2011) Phenolic contents and antioxidant activities from different tissues of baekseohyang (Daphne kiusiana). Food Sci Biotechnol 20, 695–702.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Lee SW and Lee JH (2009) Effects of oven-drying, roasting, and explosive puffing process on isoflavone distributions in soybeans. Food Chem 112, 316–320.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Locatelli M, Travaglia F, Coïsson JD, Martelli A, Stévigny C, and Arlorio M (2010) Total antioxidant activity of hazelnut skim (Nocciola Piemonte PGI): Impact of different roasting conditions. Food Chem 119, 1647–1655.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Malencic D, Popovic M, and Miladinovic J (2007) Phenolic content and antioxidant properties of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) seeds. Molecules 12, 576–581.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Manzocco L, Calligaris S, Mastrocola D, Nicoli MC, and Lerici CR (2000) Review of non-enzymatic browning and antioxidant capacity in processed foods. Trend Food Sci Biotechnol 11, 340–346.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Oliviero T, Capuano E, Cammerer B, and Fogliano V (2009) Influence of roasting on the antioxidant activity and HMF formation of a cocoa bean model systems. J Agric Food Chem 57, 147–152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Riedl KM, Lee JH, Renita M, St Martin SK, Schwartz SJ, and Vodovotz Y (2007). Isoflavone profiles, phenol content, and antioxidant activity of soybean seeds as influenced by cultivar and growing location in Ohio. J Sci Food Agric 87, 1197–1206.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Saulnier L, Marto C, Elgorriaga M, Bonnin E, and Thibault JF (2001) Thermal and enzymatic treatments for the release of free ferulic acid from maize bran. Carbohyd Polym 45, 269–275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Shimoni E (2004) Stability and shelf life of bioactive compounds during food processing and storage: soy isoflavone. J Food Sci 69, 160–166.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Shon MY, Lee J, Choi SY, Nam SH, Seo KI, Lee SW et al. (2007) Antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity of methanol extract of chungkukjang. J Food Comp Anal 20, 113–118CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Singh S and Singh RP (2008) In vitro methods of assay of antioxidant: an overview. Food Rev Int 24, 392–415.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Slavin M, Cheng Z, Luther M, Kenworthy W, and Yu L. (2009). Antioxidant properties and phenolic, isoflavone, tocopherol and carotenoid composition of Maryland-grown soybean lines with altered fatty acid profiles. Food Chem 114, 20–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Toda T, Sakamoto A, Takayanagi T, and Yokotsuka Y (2000) Changes in isoflavone compositions of soybean foods during cooking process. Food Sci Technol Res 6, 314–319.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Yang EJ, Kim SI, Hur JM, and Song KS (2009) Roasting process enhances antioxidative effect of cinnamon (Cinnamoni cortex) via increase in cinnamaldehyde content. J Korean Soc Appl Biol Chem 52, 443–447.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Youn KS and Chung HS (2012) Optimization of the roasting temperature and time for preparation of coffee-like maize beverage using the response surface methodology. LWT-Food Sci Technol 46, 305–310.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Xu Z, Wu Q, and Godber JS, (2002) Stabilities of daidzin, glycitin, genistin, and generation of derivatives during heating. J Agric Food Chem 50, 7402–7406.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Korean Society for Applied Biological Chemistry 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jin Hwan Lee
    • 1
    • 2
  • Byong Won Lee
    • 4
  • Balo Kim
    • 3
  • Hyun Tae Kim
    • 4
  • Jong Min Ko
    • 4
  • In-Yeoul Baek
    • 4
  • Weon Taek Seo
    • 3
  • Young Min Kang
    • 5
  • Kye Man Cho
    • 3
  1. 1.National Institute of Biological ResourcesMinistry of EnvironmentIncheonRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Monitoring and Analysis, NAKONG River Basin Environmental OfficeMinistry of EnvironmentChangweon, GyeongnamRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Department of Food Science and Institute of Fusion BiotechnologyGyeongnam National University of Science and TechnologyJinju, GyeongnamRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Department of Functional Crop, National Institute of Crop ScienceRural Development Administration (RDA)Miryang, GyeongnamRepublic of Korea
  5. 5.Basic Herbal Medicine Group, Herbal Medicine Research DivisionKorea Institute of Oriental Medicine (KIOM)DaejeonRepublic of Korea

Personalised recommendations