Increased sulforaphane concentration in brussels sprout following high hydrostatic pressure treatment

  • Song Yi Koo
  • Kwang Hyun Cha
  • Dae-Geun Song
  • Dong-Un Lee
  • Cheol-Ho Pan
Short Communication

Abstract

High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment was used to increase the concentration of sulforaphane in Brussels sprout, a cruciferous vegetable known to have health benefits. The highest concentration of sulforaphane was 1021.8 μmol per kg fresh weight of Brussels sprouts after HHP treatment at 500 MPa, which corresponded to a 317% increase compared to the HHP-untreated control.

Keywords

Brassica oleracea var. gemmifera Brussels sprouts glucoraphanin high hydrostatic pressure impedance sulforaphane 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society for Applied Biological Chemistry 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Song Yi Koo
    • 1
  • Kwang Hyun Cha
    • 1
  • Dae-Geun Song
    • 1
  • Dong-Un Lee
    • 2
  • Cheol-Ho Pan
    • 1
  1. 1.Functional Food CenterKorea Institute of Science and TechnologyGangneungRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Food Science and TechnologyChung-Ang UniversityAnsungRepublic of Korea

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