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Comparative nutritional analysis for genetically modified rice, Iksan483 and Milyang204, and nontransgenic counterparts

  • Hoon Choi
  • Joon-Kwan Moon
  • Byeoung-Soo Park
  • Hee-Won Park
  • So-Young Park
  • Tae-San Kim
  • Dong-Hern Kim
  • Tae-Hun Ryu
  • Soon-Jong Kweon
  • Jeong-Han Kim
Original Article Biochemistry

Abstract

Recently, two glufosinate-tolerant rice varieties, Iksan483 and Milyang204, were developed in Korea generated by adding bar gene to genomes of the conventional rice varieties. Comparative assessment of nutritional composition was conducted with genetically modified rice grains and its conventional counterparts for substantial equivalence. Nutrients including proximates, fatty acids, amino acids, minerals, vitamins, and antinutrients were investigated using several statistical comparisons. The results showed that, except for small differences in a few fatty acids, minerals, and trypsin inhibitor, there was no significant difference between genetically modified rice and conventional counterpart variety with respect to their nutrient composition. Most of measured levels of nutrients were in good compliance with the literature ranges, showing substantial equivalency. The results of principle component analysis demonstrated that the environment affects the nutritional composition and that all differences between the genetically modified and conventional rice varieties are within the range as the differences observed among conventional varieties grown in different years. Therefore, the insertion of bar gene did not change the nutritional composition of genetically modified rice grains.

Keywords

bar gene genetically modified rice nutritional composition substantial equivalence 

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Copyright information

© The Korean Society for Applied Biological Chemistry 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hoon Choi
    • 1
  • Joon-Kwan Moon
    • 2
  • Byeoung-Soo Park
    • 1
  • Hee-Won Park
    • 3
  • So-Young Park
    • 1
  • Tae-San Kim
    • 4
  • Dong-Hern Kim
    • 5
  • Tae-Hun Ryu
    • 5
  • Soon-Jong Kweon
    • 5
  • Jeong-Han Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Agricultural BiotechnologySeoul National UniversitySeoulRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.School of Plant, Life and Environmental SciencesHankyong National UniversityAnsungRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.Korea Ginseng CorporationDaejeonRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.CropLife KoreaSeoulRepublic of Korea
  5. 5.Department of Agricultural BiotechnologyNational Academy of Agricultural Science, Rural Development AdministrationSuwonRepublic of Korea

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