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Unilateral deep cerebral venous sinus thrombosis with reversible secondary parkinsonism

  • Zoltán Bajkó
  • Sebastian Andone
  • Mircea Buruian
  • Rares Filep
  • Rodica Balasa
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Cerebral venous thrombosis is a rare, but an increasingly recognized condition with protean clinical manifestations, which represents a diagnostic challenge.

The thrombosis of the internal cerebral veins is responsible for only 2% of cerebral venous infarctions and in the majority of the cases leads to the bilateral involvement of the thalamus and basal ganglia [1].

The unilateral affection of the thalamostriate region is extremely rare and has been previously described in only a few cases [1, 2].

The clinical manifestations range from headache, altered level of consciousness, nausea, vomiting, and focal neurological signs [3]. In case of unilateral affection, arm weakness is a frequent sign, associated with neuropsychological changes and somnolence [1]. Asymmetric parkinsonian symptoms which resemble Parkinson’s disease have been very rarely reported in the specialty literature [4]. In all cases bilateral involvement of the thalamus and basal ganglia or the periventricular and...

Notes

Acknowledgements

This publication was supported by the internal research Grant of the University of Medicine and Pharmacy Targu Mures (15609/8/29.12.2017).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

The authors certify that they comply with the Principles of Ethical Publishing.

Informed consent

The authors certify that the patient reported here gave his informed consent.

References

  1. 1.
    Philpott C, Brotchie P (2010) Unilateral internal cerebral vein thrombosis: review of literature and case illustration at 3T. Eur J Radiol Extra 76:e1–e6CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Herrmann KA, Sporer B, Yousry TA (2004 Sep) Thrombosis of the internal cerebral vein associated with transient unilateral thalamic edema: a case report and review of the literature. AJNR 25(8):1351–1355PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Wieshmann NH1, Amin S, Hodgson R (2009) A case of unilateral thalamic hemorrhagic infarction as a result of the vein of Galen and straight sinus thrombosis. J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis 18(1):28–31CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Kalita J, Bhoi SK, Chandra S, Misra UK (2013) Reversible parkinsonian features in deep cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Can J Neurol Sci 40(5):740–742CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Lu A, Shen PY, Dahlin BC, Nidecker AE, Nundkumar A, Lee PS (2016) Cerebral venous thrombosis and infarct: Review of imaging manifestations. Appl Radiol 45(3):9–17Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Belgian Neurological Society 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zoltán Bajkó
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sebastian Andone
    • 2
  • Mircea Buruian
    • 3
    • 4
  • Rares Filep
    • 4
  • Rodica Balasa
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyUniversity of Medicine and Pharmacy Targu MuresTârgu MureșRomania
  2. 2.Ist Neurology ClinicMures County Clinical Emergency HospitalTârgu MureșRomania
  3. 3.Department of RadiologyUniversity of Medicine and Pharmacy Targu MuresTârgu MureșRomania
  4. 4.Radiology ClinicMures County Clinical Emergency HospitalTârgu MureșRomania

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