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Acta Neurologica Belgica

, Volume 115, Issue 4, pp 547–555 | Cite as

Clinical utility and applicability of biomarker-based diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer’s disease: a BeDeCo survey

  • Jean-Christophe Bier
  • Jurn Verschraegen
  • Rik Vandenberghe
  • Bénédicte Guillaume
  • Gaëtane Picard
  • Georges Otte
  • Eric Mormont
  • Christian Gilles
  • Kurt Segers
  • Anne Sieben
  • Evert Thiery
  • Manfredi Ventura
  • Peter De Deyn
  • Olivier Deryck
  • Jan Versijpt
  • Eric Salmon
  • Sebastiaan Engelborghs
  • Adrian Ivanoiu
Original Article

Abstract

We conducted a survey regarding the medical care of patients with dementia in expert settings in Belgium. Open, unrestricted and motivated answers were centralized, blindly interpreted and structured into categories. The report of the results was then submitted to the participants in subsequent plenary meetings and through email. Fourteen experts responded to the questionnaire, confirming that recent propositions to modify Alzheimer’s disease (AD) diagnostic criteria and options have stirred up debate among well-informed and dedicated experts in the field. The opinions were not unanimous and illustrate how difficult it is to find a standardized method of diagnosing this disease. The responses to the survey suggest that application of a step-by-step pragmatic method is used in practice. Only when the combination of clinical findings and classical structural neuro-imaging is insufficient for a diagnosis or suggests an atypical presentation, additional biomarkers are considered. Interestingly, few differences, if any, were observed between the use of biomarkers in MCI and in AD. In conclusion, the Belgian experts consulted in this survey were generally in agreement with the new diagnostic criteria for AD, although some concern was expressed about them being too “amyloidocentric”. Although the clinical examination, including a full neuropsychological evaluation, is still considered as the basis for diagnosis, most experts also stated that they use biomarkers to help with diagnosis.

Keywords

Alzheimer disease Biomarkers Diagnosis criteria Expert opinion Survey 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the University of Antwerp Research Fund and the Alzheimer Research Foundation (SAO-FRA).

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Belgian Neurological Society 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jean-Christophe Bier
    • 1
  • Jurn Verschraegen
    • 2
  • Rik Vandenberghe
    • 3
  • Bénédicte Guillaume
    • 4
  • Gaëtane Picard
    • 5
  • Georges Otte
    • 1
  • Eric Mormont
    • 6
    • 7
  • Christian Gilles
    • 8
  • Kurt Segers
    • 9
  • Anne Sieben
    • 10
  • Evert Thiery
    • 10
  • Manfredi Ventura
    • 11
  • Peter De Deyn
    • 1
  • Olivier Deryck
    • 12
  • Jan Versijpt
    • 13
  • Eric Salmon
    • 14
  • Sebastiaan Engelborghs
    • 15
    • 16
  • Adrian Ivanoiu
    • 17
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyErasme Hospital, ULBBrusselsBelgium
  2. 2.Expertisecentrum Dementie, Vlaanderen vzwAntwerpBelgium
  3. 3.Neurology DepartmentUniversity Hospitals LeuvenLouvainBelgium
  4. 4.Centre hospitalier du Bois de l’Abbaye et de HesbayeSeraingBelgium
  5. 5.Neurology DepartmentClinique Saint-PierreOttigniesBelgium
  6. 6.CHU Dinant Godinne UcL Namur, Service de Neurologie, Université catholique de LouvainYvoirBelgium
  7. 7.Institute Of NeuroScience, Université catholique de LouvainLouvain-La-NeuveBelgium
  8. 8.Cognitive and Behavioral Geriatrics, Centre Hospitalier de l’Ardenne, Memory Clinic, VivaliaLibramont-ChevignyBelgium
  9. 9.Neurology DepartmentBrugmann University HospitalBrusselsBelgium
  10. 10.Department of Neurology, Ghent University HospitalGhent UniversityGhentBelgium
  11. 11.Clinique de la Mémoire du GHdC, Grand Hôpital de CharleroiCharleroiBelgium
  12. 12.Neurology Department and Centre for Cognitive DisordersAZ Sint-Jan Brugge-OostendeOstendBelgium
  13. 13.Department of NeurologyMemory Clinic, UZ BrusselBrusselsBelgium
  14. 14.Centre de la Mémoire, Service de Neurologie, CHU de Liège, et Centre de Recherches du CyclotronUniversité de LiègeLiègeBelgium
  15. 15.Reference Center for Biological Markers of Dementia (BIODEM), Institute Born-BungeUniversity of AntwerpAntwerpBelgium
  16. 16.Department of Neurology and Memory ClinicHospital Network Antwerp (ZNA) Middelheim and Hoge BeukenAntwerpBelgium
  17. 17.Department of NeurologySt Luc Hospital, Institute of Neuroscience, UcLBrusselsBelgium

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