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Current Nutrition Reports

, Volume 3, Issue 3, pp 245–280 | Cite as

Validity and Reliability of Self-Reported Measures of Foods and Nutrients in Pregnancy: A Systematic Review

  • Lydi-Anne Vézina-Im
  • Julie RobitailleEmail author
Prenatal, Neonatal, and Maternal Nutrition (DK Tobias and M-F Hivert, Section Editors)

Abstract

The aim of this systematic review is to provide a critical appraisal of evidence on the validity and reliability of self-reported measures of foods and nutrients in pregnancy. PubMed and EMBASE databases were investigated, and 54 studies were included. Food-frequency questionnaires had acceptable evidence of validity compared with biomarkers (\( \overset{-}{r} \)between 0.04 and 0.58; k = 19), 24-hour recall (\( \overset{-}{r} \)between 0.12 and 0.63; k = 11), and food records (\( \overset{-}{r} \)between 0.28 and 0.65; k = 12). Dietary history (\( \overset{-}{r} \)between 0.07 and 0.47; k = 7) and food records (\( \overset{-}{r} \)between 0.25 and 0.53; k = 7) had acceptable evidence of validity compared with biomarkers. Twenty-four-hour recall had poor evidence of validity against biomarkers. Evidence on reliability was good for food-frequency questionnaires, acceptable for dietary history, and inconclusive for 24-hour recall. The results suggest that food-frequency questionnaires and food records have the strongest evidence of validity in assessing nutrition during pregnancy, and further studies are needed to validate 24-hour recall and dietary history.

Keywords

Validation Self-report Nutrition Pregnancy Systematic review 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Lydi-Anne Vézina-Im is recipient of a doctoral research award from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research.

Compliance with Ethics Guidelines

Conflict of Interest

Lydi-Anne Vézina-Im and Julie Robitaille each declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Food Sciences and NutritionLaval UniversityQuébecCanada
  2. 2.Institute of Nutrition and Functional Foods (INAF)Laval UniversityQuébecCanada

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