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Review of Religious Research

, Volume 60, Issue 4, pp 593–594 | Cite as

Carolyn M. Warner, Ramazan Kılınç, Christopher W. Hale, and Adam B. Cohen: Generating Generosity in Catholicism and Islam: Beliefs, Institutions, and Public Goods Provision

Cambridge University Press, New York, 2018
  • Michele F. Margolis
Book Review

Social scientists frequently ask why people donate their time, effort, and money. A common answer is that religion, broadly defined, leads people to act generously, engage in prosocial behaviors, and cooperate with others. The seemingly straightforward answer, however, overlooks the different ways that religion can operate—as a set of beliefs, an institution, and a community—and how different facets of religion can shape motivations to give. Warner, Kılınç, Hale, and Cohen begin to fill in these gaps in their new book, Generating Generosity in Catholicism and Islam: Beliefs, Institutions, and Public Goods Provision.

Warner et al. argue that generosity—“giving freely of one’s resources, including funds, time, skills, and effort, to other individuals and organizations” (11)—is a function of both religious beliefs and religious institutions, but that religion operates differently across different religious faiths and contexts. To situate their research and develop hypotheses, Generating...

Copyright information

© Religious Research Association, Inc. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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