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High temperature promotes growth and flowering in Sophrolaeliocattleya

  • Hye Ryun An
  • Yoon Jin Kim
  • Oh Keun Kwon
  • Pue Hee Park
  • Pil Man Park
  • Yun Su Baek
Research Reports Cultivation Physiology
  • 85 Downloads

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of temperature on vegetative growth and flowering in Sophrolaeliocattleya ‘Red Doll’ and ‘Grace’. Plants were grown at constant temperatures of 8, 13, 18, or 23°C for 12 weeks in environmentally controlled growth chambers. Photosynthetic efficiency was measured four weeks after the start of the temperature treatment. The shoot length, leaf length, leaf width, and the number of new shoots increased in plants from both cultivars that were grown at 18 and 23°C, respectively; whereas the number of days to visible buds and flowering were reduced compared to plants grown at 8 and 13°C. The number of flowering florets and the flower diameter were greater in plants grown at 18 and 23°C than at 8 and 13°C. High photosynthetic efficiency was observed in plants grown at 23°C, which was measured as increased PSII quantum yield, photochemical quenching, and electron transport rate; and decreased non-photochemical quenching. These results indicate that temperatures of 18-23°C promote growth and stimulate earlier production of high-quality flowers in Sophrolaeliocattleya.

Additional key words

fluorescence miniature Cattleya orchid photosynthetic efficiency 

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Copyright information

© Korean Society for Horticultural Science and Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hye Ryun An
    • 1
  • Yoon Jin Kim
    • 2
  • Oh Keun Kwon
    • 1
  • Pue Hee Park
    • 1
  • Pil Man Park
    • 1
  • Yun Su Baek
    • 1
  1. 1.Floriculture Research DivisionNational Institute of Horticultural & Herbal Science, R.D.A.WanjuKorea
  2. 2.Department of Horticulture, Biotechnology and Landscape ArchitectureSeoul Women’s UniversitySeoulKorea

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