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Horticulture, Environment, and Biotechnology

, Volume 56, Issue 5, pp 575–581 | Cite as

Effects of foliar fertilization containing titanium dioxide on growth, yield and quality of strawberries during cultivation

  • Hyo Gil Choi
  • Byoung Yong Moon
  • Khoshimkhujaev Bekhzod
  • Kyoung Sub Park
  • Joon Kook Kwon
  • Jae Han Lee
  • Myeong Whan Cho
  • Nam Jun Kang
Research Report Cultivation Physiology

Abstract

We addressed the question of whether it is useful to apply a titanium dioxide (TiO2) solution to promote the growth of strawberry plants in a greenhouse when they suffer from insufficient solar radiation during the winter season. A TiO2 solution was sprayed on strawberry plants three times during the growth period. This treatment occurred once on the 5th day of each month from December to February at concentrations of 50, 100 or 150 mg·kg -1. The control strawberry plants were treated with a foliar solution lacking TiO2. The length of the petiole was inhibited by TiO2 treatments, especially those in January and February. In terms of the fruits, the TiO2 applications were found to increase the yield and hardness of strawberries compared to the control. In addition, the contents of chlorophyll a and b in the leaves of the strawberries were increased by the treatment with TiO2 foliar spray. In contrast, the phenolic compounds of the fruits were decreased as a result of the TiO2 treatments. Combined, our results reveal that the application of TiO2 can promote the yield and quality of strawberry plants sufferings from a shortage of sunlight in a plastic greenhouse during the winter season.

Additional key words

photocatalyst phytochemicals sugar contents 

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Copyright information

© Korean Society for Horticultural Science and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hyo Gil Choi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Byoung Yong Moon
    • 3
  • Khoshimkhujaev Bekhzod
    • 1
  • Kyoung Sub Park
    • 1
  • Joon Kook Kwon
    • 1
  • Jae Han Lee
    • 1
  • Myeong Whan Cho
    • 1
  • Nam Jun Kang
    • 2
    • 4
  1. 1.Protected Horticulture Research InstituteNational Institute of Horticultural & Herbal Science, Rural Development AdministrationHamanKorea
  2. 2.Department of HorticultureGyeongsang National UniversityJinjuKorea
  3. 3.Department of Biological SciencesInje UniversityGimhaeKorea
  4. 4.Institute of Agric. & Life Sci.Gyeongsang National UniversityJinjuKorea

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