Human Cell

, Volume 26, Issue 3, pp 121–127

Establishment and characterization of a novel ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma cell line, TU-OC-1, with a mutation in the PIK3CA gene

  • Hiroaki Itamochi
  • Misaki Kato
  • Mayumi Nishimura
  • Nao Oumi
  • Tetsuro Oishi
  • Muneaki Shimada
  • Shinya Sato
  • Jun Naniwa
  • Seiya Sato
  • Michiko Nonaka
  • Akiko Kudoh
  • Naoki Terakawa
  • Junzo Kigawa
  • Tasuku Harada
Cell Line

Abstract

A new cell line of human ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma (CCC), TU-OC-1, was established and characterized. The cells showed a polygonal-shaped morphology and grew in monolayers without contact inhibition and were arranged like a jigsaw puzzle. The chromosome numbers ranged from 64 to 90. A low rate of proliferation was observed, similar to other CCC cell lines tested (OVTOKO, RMG-I, and OVAS), and the doubling time was 38.4 h. The respective IC50 values of cisplatin and paclitaxel were 12.2 μM and 58.3 nM. Mutational analysis revealed that TU-OC-1 cells harbored a PIK3CA mutation at codon 542 (E542K) in exon 9, which is a mutation hot spot on this gene. We observed that phosphorylated Akt protein was overexpressed in TU-OC-1 cells by western blot analysis. Heterotransplantation to nude mice produced tumors that reflected the original. This cell line may be useful to study the chemoresistant mechanisms of CCC and contribute to novel treatment strategies.

Keywords

Ovarian clear cell adenocarcinoma Establishment PIK3CA mutation Chemosensitivity Molecular targeted therapy 

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Copyright information

© Japan Human Cell Society and Springer Japan 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroaki Itamochi
    • 1
  • Misaki Kato
    • 2
  • Mayumi Nishimura
    • 2
  • Nao Oumi
    • 2
  • Tetsuro Oishi
    • 1
  • Muneaki Shimada
    • 1
  • Shinya Sato
    • 1
  • Jun Naniwa
    • 1
  • Seiya Sato
    • 1
  • Michiko Nonaka
    • 1
  • Akiko Kudoh
    • 1
  • Naoki Terakawa
    • 1
  • Junzo Kigawa
    • 2
  • Tasuku Harada
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyTottori University School of MedicineYonagoJapan
  2. 2.Tottori University Hospital Cancer CenterYonagoJapan

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