Human Cell

, Volume 25, Issue 1, pp 24–28 | Cite as

Heat shock protein 27 and p16 immunohistochemistry in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and squamous cell carcinoma

  • Akiko Tozawa-Ono
  • Ayako Yoshida
  • Noriyuki Yokomachi
  • Rumiko Handa
  • Hirotaka Koizumi
  • Kazushige Kiguchi
  • Bunpei Ishizuka
  • Nao Suzuki
Research Article

Abstract

Heat shock protein 27 (hsp27) is expressed by squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Results from an earlier study by our group indicted that hsp27 may be a diagnostic marker for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and carcinoma. p16 expression is known to be elevated in intraepithelial uterine cervical cancer and grades 2 and 3 lesions (CIN2, CIN3), but has also been reported to be negative in 5–20% of cervical cancer and CIN lesions. The aim of our study was to confirm immunohistochemically the expression of hsp27 and p16 in cervical lesions. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cervical tissue specimens obtained between 2002 and 2010 were investigated for hsp27 and p16 expression. Positive staining was detected for hsp27 in 63% of normal cervical tissues, 47% of CIN1 lesions, 75% of CIN2 lesions, 92% of CIN3 lesions, and 100% of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC); the corresponding rates for p16 positivity were 29, 47, 67, 92, and 75%, respectively. Positive staining for both hsp27 and p16 was observed in 6% of normal cervical tissues and in 19% of CIN1, 18% of CIN2, 85% of CIN3, and 75% of SCC specimens. Hsp27 or p16 positivity had a sensitivity of 95.6 or 84.7% and a specificity of 37.2 or 70.5%, respectively, for the identification of CIN3 or SCC lesions; when both hsp27 and p16 were assessed, both the sensitivity and specificity were improved. In conclusion, both hsp27 and p16 immunohistochemistry is a useful tool for the diagnosis of CIN3 lesions or cervical SCC.

Keywords

Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia Immunohistochemistry Heat shock protein 27 p16 Squamous cell carcinoma 

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Copyright information

© Japan Human Cell Society and Springer 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Akiko Tozawa-Ono
    • 1
  • Ayako Yoshida
    • 1
  • Noriyuki Yokomachi
    • 1
  • Rumiko Handa
    • 2
  • Hirotaka Koizumi
    • 2
  • Kazushige Kiguchi
    • 1
  • Bunpei Ishizuka
    • 1
  • Nao Suzuki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologySt. Marianna University School of MedicineMiyamae, KawasakiJapan
  2. 2.Department of Diagnostic PathologySt. Marianna University School of MedicineMiyamae, KawasakiJapan

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